15:26 15:26

When Yang Collapses–Rebuilding The Fires

By |2018-05-31T13:41:58+00:00February 11th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions|Tags: , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP

Yang collapse–sound pretty severe, right? In Chinese medicine it is–and it’s often a long, slow and difficult hill to climb for recovery.  Why? Literally, you have burnt out the fire and transformative functions in the body.  Most importantly, clients who have reached deep Yang deficiency are notoriously bad about resting– which is essential to rebuilding Yang.

How deficiencies arise

You played too hard. You became severely ill. You didn’t eat or rest appropriately.  You were under too much stress.  Sometimes we can narrow it down and find one thing that may have caused the collapse but most often it’s a number things that combined leading to eventual collapse. There are many avenues in which the body takes impact of stress, illness and daily living, and when we are vital and healthy we bounce back. Overtime, however, we may continue to dwindle and signs of deficiency will show up.  It’s a progressive process that left unchecked will get worse and worse until something gives way.

The progression of deficiency in the body

Qi Deficiency–Qi deficiency is the starting place. Fortunately, Qi deficiency, though common, is very easy to recover from.  You’re a bit tired, worn out from the day, nothing that a good night’s sleep and some appropriate rest can’t fix.   There will be little change in the tongue, and the pulses will feel a little weak, but you will recover quickly.  Find out more about building Qi here.

Yin or Yang?–Left unchecked, Qi deficiency will progress, leading down a path of either Yin or Yang deficiency. Which path you follow depends on life circumstances, constitution, pre-existing weaknesses and other factors.  Truly, both Yin and Yang are going to […]

13:28 13:28

Yin

By |2018-05-31T13:38:57+00:00November 30th, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Yin

Tyra Burgess, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM)

Yin

Perhaps, the most simple word to speak, and the most complex topic of study.  Half of the foundation of thought behind all Eastern theory. The concept of balance, and the two opposites that create a whole. To explain just half of the whole, to understand Yin, is to understand much more than just a concept. The definition of Yin, is explained by examples, characteristics in nature, and actions that achieve Yin, thus making the comprehension of the meaning inherent in the word, difficult to define. Contained within Yin, is even its definition–in.

“For as long as man must interact with his environment, he must strive for balance with it.” (Sohn)

Growing up in the Western hemisphere of the planet, the concept of balance, the idea of Yin is so foreign, our culture says “ying”…the wrong word completely. The United States was founded and grown on totally Yang principles, and as we pour into our hospitals, and doctors offices for adrenal fatigue, auto-immune disorders, chronic inflammation, digestive failure, cancer and mental illness, the demand for understanding the idea of Yin, and our lack of it, has never been more needed. As a culture, we could all use more of the silence Yin that passively beckons us to nourish the depths of our bodies and being.

Yin is: INtrospection, INtroverstion, going deep withIN. Yin is characterized as earth, moon, dark, solid, deep, sinking and material.  Yin is the expression of the receptive or passive polarity. Yin has the qualities of cold, damp, immobility and substance. The element of water, the colors of dark blue and black. Stillness and cold.  Yet without defining Yin in relation to its […]