11:22 11:22

Warm To The Core

By | 2017-03-06T09:42:17+00:00 December 20th, 2016|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, The Seasons, Winter|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Warm To The Core

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Baby, it’s cold outside.  Now that you have an ear worm to pester you for the day, let’s talk about keeping the core of the body warm.

The Asian cultures have a long tradition of dressing to protect the abdomen and the lower back and with good reason–the Kidneys.  Called the “Root of Life” in Chinese medicine, and their energies and organs are greatly protected in classical Asian medicine and martial arts.   In Japanese, the region is called the Hara, in Chinese it’s the Dan Tian. All Asian cultures hold the same concept–the vital energy of the body is centered in the space  located just behind the belly button to between the two kidneys.   If you’ve ever done martial arts, this where you move from.  It’s your core,  and the store house of energy and we want to keep it warm.

The Kidneys are the “Root of Life” and “Sealed Storage”

Let me see if I can boil down a 5 hour lecture into a couple of simple paragraphs.

All organs have a Yin and Yang aspect, however, these two aspects take on a different meaning with the Kidneys.  The Kidneys are the foundation for all Yin and Yang for all organs. One of the first channels to develop as a baby grows, Kidney Yin is the foundation or “root” for the Yin and the Yang organs alike, making it the basis for Fire and Water in the body.  If the Kidney energy is strong, the baby will grow strong and have vitality.  Kidney energy is required for all growth, maturation and reproduction– the bones, marrow, and spine;  and […]

13:28 13:28

Yin

By | 2018-05-31T13:38:57+00:00 November 30th, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Yin

Tyra Burgess, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM)

Yin

Perhaps, the most simple word to speak, and the most complex topic of study.  Half of the foundation of thought behind all Eastern theory. The concept of balance, and the two opposites that create a whole. To explain just half of the whole, to understand Yin, is to understand much more than just a concept. The definition of Yin, is explained by examples, characteristics in nature, and actions that achieve Yin, thus making the comprehension of the meaning inherent in the word, difficult to define. Contained within Yin, is even its definition–in.

“For as long as man must interact with his environment, he must strive for balance with it.” (Sohn)

Growing up in the Western hemisphere of the planet, the concept of balance, the idea of Yin is so foreign, our culture says “ying”…the wrong word completely. The United States was founded and grown on totally Yang principles, and as we pour into our hospitals, and doctors offices for adrenal fatigue, auto-immune disorders, chronic inflammation, digestive failure, cancer and mental illness, the demand for understanding the idea of Yin, and our lack of it, has never been more needed. As a culture, we could all use more of the silence Yin that passively beckons us to nourish the depths of our bodies and being.

Yin is: INtrospection, INtroverstion, going deep withIN. Yin is characterized as earth, moon, dark, solid, deep, sinking and material.  Yin is the expression of the receptive or passive polarity. Yin has the qualities of cold, damp, immobility and substance. The element of water, the colors of dark blue and black. Stillness and cold.  Yet without defining Yin in relation to its […]

10:30 10:30

The Do’s and Don’ts of New Years Resolutions

By | 2018-05-31T13:35:50+00:00 December 31st, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Holistic Living, The Seasons|Tags: , , |Comments Off on The Do’s and Don’ts of New Years Resolutions

Welcome to January!  For many the start of the new year is a time to start something new in their lives.  Though this is an admirable ideal, most new years resolutions, especially those involving drastic exercise regimes or diets, only last a couple of weeks.  Is this lack of resolve due to weakness on the part of the resolver?  Generally, no.

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, winter is a time when energy moves deep into the core of the body.  It is natural for our limbs to be cooler, our energy levels to be lower, for it to be a little harder to wake in the morning, and for a little bit of extra weight to settle on our frames.  In essence our bodies naturally want to hibernate.  During this time of year our bodies are using that deep energy to heal and repair injuries from the previous year, solidifying ideas and goals that we put into place and planning for new goals when the weather warms.  And there is the crux, the body doesn’t want you doing anything extreme during this time as it disrupts its natural winter processes.

Keeping the energy flows of the body in mind, the following are some things that the body would really rather not try to do in the winter and therefore make poor choices for resolutions.

  • Starting a new exercise routine
  • Starting a weight loss program
  • Doing cleanses or fasts
  • Giving up a long standing vice like smoking or drinking
  • Making dietary changes that involve eliminating heavier foods like meat or bread

All of the above examples are asking your body to moving energy outward, away from the core. If you have been exercising already, keeping the routine going in the winter is ok, though you […]