11:47 11:47

Shi Fan (Rice Congee or Jook)

By | 2018-05-15T16:50:54+00:00 September 19th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Comfort Food, Common Conditions, Crock pot, Gluten Free, Recipes, Soups and Stew, Vegan, Vegetarian, Whole Grains|Tags: , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Shi Fan (Rice Congee or Jook)

Congee, Shi-Fan (literally, rice water) or Jook. Whatever name you give it, rice porridge has been the foundation of nutritional healing since…well, we started playing with fire and cooking.  It is my first recommendation for anyone who is weak or ill, whether young or old.
Congee is a eaten by millions as a breakfast food.  The simple gruel is served with a variety of side dishes, shredded vegetables and fish, shredded meats and pickles.

Besides being a great morning start, congee is a fantastic healing food.

It’s just rice and water or broth.  Perhaps another ingredient is added to added to create a specific result. Sounds boring right? However, sometimes simplicity is the best approach to healing.  I always consider the client’s digestive vitality first in any treatment.  If they have problems absorbing nutrients for whatever reason, be it illness, chemo or radiation treatment or constitutional weakness,  they will not transform the food they eat into healing nutrient qi.   In these cases, simple foods cooked for a long period place less of a burden on the digestive system.

Who can benefit from congee?

Anyone.  I’ve seen it work wonders with toddlers on acid reflux medicines to seniors battling dementia, those going through chemo and radiation to those just fighting the common cold.   There is no magic, it is just simplicity.

Healing benefits of congee

Rice is neutral to warming, there are over 8 thousand varieties of rice and very few people are allergic to rice. If you are someone avoiding gluten…use a gluten free rice.  Rice tonifies the Qi and Blood and harmonizes the Middle Burner (your digestive system), the Stomach and the Spleen.  Water balances our PH, detoxes and nourishes Yin.  The rest of the recipe is up to […]

13:28 13:28

Yin

By | 2018-05-31T13:38:57+00:00 November 30th, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Yin

Tyra Burgess, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM)

Yin

Perhaps, the most simple word to speak, and the most complex topic of study.  Half of the foundation of thought behind all Eastern theory. The concept of balance, and the two opposites that create a whole. To explain just half of the whole, to understand Yin, is to understand much more than just a concept. The definition of Yin, is explained by examples, characteristics in nature, and actions that achieve Yin, thus making the comprehension of the meaning inherent in the word, difficult to define. Contained within Yin, is even its definition–in.

“For as long as man must interact with his environment, he must strive for balance with it.” (Sohn)

Growing up in the Western hemisphere of the planet, the concept of balance, the idea of Yin is so foreign, our culture says “ying”…the wrong word completely. The United States was founded and grown on totally Yang principles, and as we pour into our hospitals, and doctors offices for adrenal fatigue, auto-immune disorders, chronic inflammation, digestive failure, cancer and mental illness, the demand for understanding the idea of Yin, and our lack of it, has never been more needed. As a culture, we could all use more of the silence Yin that passively beckons us to nourish the depths of our bodies and being.

Yin is: INtrospection, INtroverstion, going deep withIN. Yin is characterized as earth, moon, dark, solid, deep, sinking and material.  Yin is the expression of the receptive or passive polarity. Yin has the qualities of cold, damp, immobility and substance. The element of water, the colors of dark blue and black. Stillness and cold.  Yet without defining Yin in relation to its […]

14:35 14:35

Understanding The Season of Late Summer

By | 2018-05-31T13:35:43+00:00 September 3rd, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Holistic Living, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Understanding The Season of Late Summer

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

The days are growing shorter, the air has a crisp bite, the kids are back in school and the first leaves are starting to change.  It’s not Summer anymore, yet it’s not really Fall either.  We are drifting from Summer into Late Summer.  Most of us have heard of  Indian or Late Summer,  there is a sudden warming glow again before Autumn takes hold.  In Chinese medicine this is a special season all its own.  In truth, the season encompasses four particular times of year, not just Late Summer.  Late Summer or ‘Dojo’, as it is called by the Japanese, is the buffer between each of the four main seasons. It is a time of balance, a buffering from shifting from one season to the next corresponding to the week before and after each equinox and the solstice.  This time of year is all about centering and it provides us some excellent opportunities to nourish our bodies, especially the digestive system.   […]

09:47 09:47

The 5 Elements (Wu Hsing)

By | 2018-05-31T13:35:43+00:00 September 3rd, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on The 5 Elements (Wu Hsing)

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Like Yin/Yang theory, the 5 Elements (or Wu Hsing) are a founding principle of Chinese medicine.  Each of the 5 Elements (Fire, Earth, Metal, Water & Wood) describes the natural dynamic flow of Qi  through the correspondences for season, flavor, organ, climate condition, sound, time of day, and emotion—just to name a few.  By understanding the 5 Elements we can use them to both prevent and treat many imbalances.  Here’s a (very) brief overview of the 5 Elements.

Wood is the element associated with the season of Spring, dawn and youth.  It means new growth and is represented by the color green.   The energy is expansive, moving up and in all directions.  Wood rules the Liver and GallBladder organs and is affected by emotions of anger and frustration.  The climatic factor associated with the element is Wind, which can appear as disharmonies in the body like Bell’s palsy, ticks and epilepsy.  The flavor is sour like lemons and vinegar.  Find out more about eating in Spring.

Fire is associated with Summer, noon time, when we are most active.  The energy is at its peak before calming.  Fire moves upward and hot and it rules the Heart, Pericardium, Small Intestines and the Triple Burner.  Its emotion is joy and elation.  It represented by the color red and heat. Disharmonies may appear as nervous agitation, excessive sweating, thirst and fever.  Its flavor is bitter such as, dark greens, olives and roasted seaweed.  Find out more about eating in Summer.

Earth represents a state of neutrality or balance.   Although often called Late Summer, its season is actually the transition from one to another–the equinoxes and solistices.  It symbolizes rebalancing, […]