08:55 08:55

Spring Cleaning–From Inside to Outside

By | 2018-04-12T09:24:40+00:00 April 9th, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Holistic Living, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Spring Cleaning–From Inside to Outside

There’s a buzzing of excitement in the air and in our bodies.  It’s spring, the season of the wood element and the energy is up and outward in powerful surges. It’s a time of change and growth. Our bodies want to move more, we have more energy within us and we want to ‘Get Up and Go!’

Our bodies feel seasonal changes, when we are in harmony with these shifts we can delight in the blessings of the season–being able to plan, see options, grow and be flexible–our energy is sparked and we have come to life.

In disharmony, we resist the changes and encounter difficulties. During the spring this can result in agitation, angst, restlessness, feelings of being stuck in a situation and the inability to see any solutions. From a Chinese medicine perspective we see a lot of Liver Yang Rising (energy moving up too quickly) causing high pitched ringing in the ears, headaches, bursts of anger and angst.  Wind is also a culprit in the spring and can appear as tearing of the eyes, twitches, allergies, Bell’s palsy, tick and even strokes. If you suffer from some of these patterns the best thing to do is act now to prevent flare-ups.

Here are a few tips.

Clear out the past

The more debris left on the ground (our minds or body) it takes longer for the crocus and other bulbs to push through. Nutritionally this is a good time to do a gentle cleansing or fasting, with raw vegetables and fruit juices. Check with your practitioner to see if this is an option for you. Fasting isn’t for everyone, and can do more harm than good if you aren’t prepared well.

Include a few raw foods

It’s the season for greens, sprouts, salads and fruits, while decreasing […]

09:00 09:00

Spring’s Energetics–The Season Of The Wood Element

By | 2018-05-31T13:42:07+00:00 March 6th, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Spring, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Spring’s Energetics–The Season Of The Wood Element

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Welcome to Spring!

When does Spring really begin? For most Western cultures, we correlate the start of Spring with the Spring equinox, around March 20-21st.  But all of us know that Spring has been well underway by the time the equinox pops up. If you look at the seasonal correspondences in Chinese medicine’s Yin/Yang theory, the Winter solstice marks the depth of Winter, yet as soon as we reach maximum Yin (the shortest day of the year), Yang and light start to return–literally, Spring is on its way.  A quick look at the lunar calendar can also help us understand why Spring seems to come early or late from one year to the next.  The Chinese New Year heralds the start of the Spring festivals and planting seasons.  This holiday falls on the second new moon after the Winter solstice, sometime between the end of January and the middle of February.

Our bodies feel seasonal changes, and when we are in harmony with these shifts we can delight in the blessings of the season.  However, the transition from Winter to Spring is perhaps, the most tumultuous transition. It’s a duel between the quiet and restive inward energy of Winter into the strong, upward ascending of Yang energy–and its energy can be big.  The season of the Wood element, Spring is a time of tremendous energy, and excitement in the world and in our bodies.   It’s a time of change and growth.  Our bodies want to move more, we have more energy within us and we want to get up and go!  In disharmony, we resist the changes and encounter difficulties.  During the Spring this can […]

11:03 11:03

Windy Conditions

By | 2018-05-31T13:42:04+00:00 March 31st, 2016|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Spring|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Windy Conditions

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT. NCCAOM CI & CP, CHN

It’s a blustery day!

Each of the 5 Seasons in Chinese medicine has a climatic nature that it corresponds to.  Summer relates to Heat, Autumn to Dryness, Winter to Cold, Late Summer  (the transition of seasons) relates to Dampness, and Spring corresponds to Wind. These climates are simply part of the  nature of the season, and people may be more vulnerable to these climatic conditions, and each can manifest as a series of patterns in the body.  What I pay attention to, as Chinese medicine practitioner and Amma Therapist, is how these may manifest in the body.  Ah…here comes the Wind.   Whipping through the tops of the trees, windy patterns may arise in our bodies as colds, allergies, ticks, stiff necks and more.  In Chinese medicine, Wind corresponds to Spring season and the Liver and Gall Bladder channel, and most Springs are windy.  But Wind can invade in any season, and Wind often picks up again in the Autumn.

Wind can be an exterior or interior pattern

Exterior pathogens (Wind, Hot, Cold, Dry, Damp, Summer Heat ) invade our bodies either because the pathogen is excessively strong compared to normal Wei Qi (immunity), think of plagues and virulent viruses–OR–the body is too week to fend off the invasion.   This is the pattern that appears in people who seem to get sick at the drop of a hat.

Interior patterns are generated by disharmonies within the body.  Eating too many hot foods can damage the Yin (cooling) of the body and lead to heat.  Although there may be a bit of overlap, the treatment focus of interior vs exterior will be different.  Read more on exterior and interior […]

14:35 14:35

Understanding The Season of Late Summer

By | 2018-05-31T13:35:43+00:00 September 3rd, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Holistic Living, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Understanding The Season of Late Summer

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

The days are growing shorter, the air has a crisp bite, the kids are back in school and the first leaves are starting to change.  It’s not Summer anymore, yet it’s not really Fall either.  We are drifting from Summer into Late Summer.  Most of us have heard of  Indian or Late Summer,  there is a sudden warming glow again before Autumn takes hold.  In Chinese medicine this is a special season all its own.  In truth, the season encompasses four particular times of year, not just Late Summer.  Late Summer or ‘Dojo’, as it is called by the Japanese, is the buffer between each of the four main seasons. It is a time of balance, a buffering from shifting from one season to the next corresponding to the week before and after each equinox and the solstice.  This time of year is all about centering and it provides us some excellent opportunities to nourish our bodies, especially the digestive system.   […]

14:30 14:30

A New Look At the Intermountain Home Landscape Green Spaces: Part 1

By | 2018-05-25T12:35:38+00:00 May 31st, 2011|Categories: Blogs, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on A New Look At the Intermountain Home Landscape Green Spaces: Part 1

The article below is part one of a series graciously contributed by one of our clients. Watch next month for part 2!

A New Look At the Intermountain Home Landscape Green Spaces

By William Habblett, CNP, CPD
Landscape Industry Certified Manager
CWI Horticulture Instructor

Acres upon acres of Kentucky bluegrass (KBG), dusted with some perennial rye cover the landscapes of residential and commercial areas. These fields of green give back a feeling of serenity that stems from the open view that we can see for miles and the actual calming, “negative space” in the landscape where your eyes can rest. All that it asks for is just a few things: weekly mowing, edge trimming and removal from the flower and shrub beds for 36 weeks, at least 36” of moisture through the growing season, 5 pounds of Nitrogen per 1,000 sq ft per year, weed controls and at least aeration once per year. So you ask, what’s the problem with this for the simple visual serenity that has driven us for the last 150 years?

Most people average at least an hour per week mowing and maintaining their lawn. While this can be considered some great physical activity, most of us use motorized equipment that for every hours used, releases more pollutants than ten cars driven for an hour. Moisture? We average eleven inches of moisture per year in snow and rainfall in the Treasure Valley, where KBG requires at least 36” moisture to maintain summer green but will do best with 56” of moisture. But how much water does that equal? You need to apply 22,450 to 34,900 gallons of water per 25’ x 40’ section of turf per year.

Now in fairness, it is also the most drought […]