09:33 09:33

Elderberry Syrup and Tea for Colds and Flu

By |2018-11-08T12:52:28+00:00November 2nd, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Elderberry Syrup and Tea for Colds and Flu

As Autumn creeps in I stock my cupboards with a few items to prevent and treat colds and flu. Gan Mao Ling, Kwan Loong oil, vitamin C, Immustim or Wellness Formula, to name a few, but one of my favorites is simple and reliable elderberry tea and syrup.

All parts of the elder plant have a long history in folk medicine. The flower is used to promote sweating and resolve phlegm from exterior pathogens. The inner bark and root are used as strong emetics and to relieve stubborn constipation. The leaves and berries can be made into poultices with vinegar or honey to relieve damp heat in the skin such as poison ivy.

Elderberry syrup is one of the first things that I reach for when someone is starting to fight a cold or flu. From a Chinese medicine perspective there are two major reasons that we get sick: either our system is weak and susceptible to exterior invasion (Lung qi and wei qi deficiency) or the pathogen is exceptionally strong relative to us (think of plagues). Elderberry helps to strengthen any Lung deficiency condition, giving your immune system a powerful boost. It is antiviral and anti-infective, perfect for fighting off those pesky viruses. The berry also has expectorant, diaphoretic and diuretic properties to help move fluids, the bowels and relieve phlegm. It even helps treat food poisoning. Elderberry is high in calcium, vitamins A, C and B6 and iron—and, best of all, it’s tasty and kids don’t usually mind it.

So how do I use it?
I start to use elderberry tea (often mixed with other teas like berry or nettles) several times a week at the start of school or weather transitions. The syrup is handy for […]

11:03 11:03

Windy Conditions

By |2018-05-31T13:42:04+00:00March 31st, 2016|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Spring|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT. NCCAOM CI & CP, CHN

It’s a blustery day!

Each of the 5 Seasons in Chinese medicine has a climatic nature that it corresponds to.  Summer relates to Heat, Autumn to Dryness, Winter to Cold, Late Summer  (the transition of seasons) relates to Dampness, and Spring corresponds to Wind. These climates are simply part of the  nature of the season, and people may be more vulnerable to these climatic conditions, and each can manifest as a series of patterns in the body.  What I pay attention to, as Chinese medicine practitioner and Amma Therapist, is how these may manifest in the body.  Ah…here comes the Wind.   Whipping through the tops of the trees, windy patterns may arise in our bodies as colds, allergies, ticks, stiff necks and more.  In Chinese medicine, Wind corresponds to Spring season and the Liver and Gall Bladder channel, and most Springs are windy.  But Wind can invade in any season, and Wind often picks up again in the Autumn.

Wind can be an exterior or interior pattern

Exterior pathogens (Wind, Hot, Cold, Dry, Damp, Summer Heat ) invade our bodies either because the pathogen is excessively strong compared to normal Wei Qi (immunity), think of plagues and virulent viruses–OR–the body is too week to fend off the invasion.   This is the pattern that appears in people who seem to get sick at the drop of a hat.

Interior patterns are generated by disharmonies within the body.  Eating too many hot foods can damage the Yin (cooling) of the body and lead to heat.  Although there may be a bit of overlap, the treatment focus of interior vs exterior will be different.  Read more on exterior and interior […]

09:28 09:28

Why See a Nutritionist? A Short List of What Nutrition Can Treat

By |2016-12-29T12:24:17+00:00October 6th, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

We are glad you asked!

Nutritional and dietary habits are some of the most profound changes we can make that will have a broad effect on our well-being.    Whether we eat processed fast foods, eat irregularly or enjoy a healthy whole foods diet–our relationship with food defines how we live.

What can nutritional changes treat? 

Honestly, what can’t it treat or radically improve?   Almost anyone will benefit from increasing the vegetables in their diet.  Still, no two people are alike and we have different nutritional goals and needs, your Holistic Nutritionist can help you understand your individual needs help you incorporate specific foods to meet those goals.  Below is a short list of disharmonies that can be treated or improved through nutrition.

  • acne
  • acute disease (colds–yep, ideally, you change your diet to treat the current condition present)
  • arthritis
  • autism
  • bronchitis
  • cancer
  • candida
  • chronic fatigue
  • chronic or acute pain
  • cystic fibrosis
  • depression
  • diabetes
  • eating disorders
  • fibromyalgia
  • gall bladder disorders
  • gout
  • headaches
  • high blood pressure
  • hyper/hypo thyroid
  • improved athletic performance
  • infertility
  • irritable bowel, Crohn’s, Diverticulitis
  • liver disease
  • menopause
  • MS
  • menstrual disharmonies
  • pms
  • recovery or injury
  • weight loss
Eat well, be well!
April

 

12:23 12:23

Holistic Tips for Colds & Flus Workshop

By |2016-12-29T12:24:17+00:00October 1st, 2014|Categories: Blogs|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Holistic Tips for

Colds & Flus Workshop

 

Before taking April’s class, I had spent at least a year in and out of doctors’ offices with sinus infections. I was taking anti-biotics, using inhalers, and constantly feeling run-down. The information on herbal first aid has had a dramatic positive impact on my health.  I would highly recommend this class to anyone who wants to improve their health naturally.

-J. F.

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