13:19 13:19

Loving Your Lungs

By |2018-05-31T13:42:05+00:00August 25th, 2016|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions|Tags: , , , , , , , |0 Comments

Tyra Burgess, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM)

Ughhhh, our air! This summer has been an interesting one as far as our lungs are concerned. With our record high temperatures, the valley being saturated in smoke from fires as close as the East end, and as far away as Lowman, our lungs have been hit hard.

“At the physical level, boundary, breath and renewal are expressed as the lungs, the skin and the colon. The Lung refers to the whole respiratory system and includes the nose and sinuses. Across the boundary of the lungs oxygen is taken in and carbon dioxide waste is excreted. Since most human energy is derived from air, the Lung is primarily responsible for physical vitality and is said to govern Qi in the body.” (http://www.meridianpress.net/articles/thelung-chinesemedicine.html)  
This summer here at Pulse, we have treated a large amount of what Chinese medicine terms Lung Wind, Lung Yin deficiency, and what Western medicine would call Pnuemonia, bronchitis, sinus infections, and Pertussis. Patients affected by the smoke, have snotty noses, itchy and burning tongues, strange hives, a dry barky cough that gets worse at night.  Our lungs are creating more mucus in our mouths and noses, to trap the pollution, before it enters the lungs and to move it out.
“The Lung’s paired Organ, the Colon, is concerned with release and elimination. The Lung and Colon together are related to immunity, the strength of the protective boundary. Pathogens most easily enter through the respiratory and digestive systems and the Lung and Colon are responsible for maintaining the integrity of these systems so that they are not penetrated by invaders. According to Chinese medicine, the body’s defensive energy is directly […]

13:28 13:28

Yin

By |2018-05-31T13:38:57+00:00November 30th, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Yin

Tyra Burgess, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM)

Yin

Perhaps, the most simple word to speak, and the most complex topic of study.  Half of the foundation of thought behind all Eastern theory. The concept of balance, and the two opposites that create a whole. To explain just half of the whole, to understand Yin, is to understand much more than just a concept. The definition of Yin, is explained by examples, characteristics in nature, and actions that achieve Yin, thus making the comprehension of the meaning inherent in the word, difficult to define. Contained within Yin, is even its definition–in.

“For as long as man must interact with his environment, he must strive for balance with it.” (Sohn)

Growing up in the Western hemisphere of the planet, the concept of balance, the idea of Yin is so foreign, our culture says “ying”…the wrong word completely. The United States was founded and grown on totally Yang principles, and as we pour into our hospitals, and doctors offices for adrenal fatigue, auto-immune disorders, chronic inflammation, digestive failure, cancer and mental illness, the demand for understanding the idea of Yin, and our lack of it, has never been more needed. As a culture, we could all use more of the silence Yin that passively beckons us to nourish the depths of our bodies and being.

Yin is: INtrospection, INtroverstion, going deep withIN. Yin is characterized as earth, moon, dark, solid, deep, sinking and material.  Yin is the expression of the receptive or passive polarity. Yin has the qualities of cold, damp, immobility and substance. The element of water, the colors of dark blue and black. Stillness and cold.  Yet without defining Yin in relation to its […]

09:40 09:40

Exterior and Interior Causes of Disease According to The 8 Principles

By |2016-12-29T12:24:20+00:00August 17th, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Why do we get ill?

Illness or disharmonies are reflective of a homeodynamic imbalance in the body.  Likely you’ve heard of the term ‘homeostatis’–the idea that the body reaches a healthy point and then stays there.  I prefer homeodynamic, because our body and mind is constantly adjusting, like a tightrope walker, to come back to health.  It’s a very dynamic and active process not one that reaches a plateau and then becomes static.

It’s not always clear sometimes, however the 8 Principles theory of Chinese Medicine can help us identify the functional disharmony and thereby focus treatment. Like Five ElementsOrgan theory,  and the 6 Jiao, the 8 Principles is just one of many tools that a Chinese Medicine practitioner has available to identify patterns and thereby hone treatment to the individual.   […]