09:33 09:33

Elderberry Syrup and Tea for Colds and Flu

By |2018-11-08T12:52:28+00:00November 2nd, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Elderberry Syrup and Tea for Colds and Flu

As Autumn creeps in I stock my cupboards with a few items to prevent and treat colds and flu. Gan Mao Ling, Kwan Loong oil, vitamin C, Immustim or Wellness Formula, to name a few, but one of my favorites is simple and reliable elderberry tea and syrup.

All parts of the elder plant have a long history in folk medicine. The flower is used to promote sweating and resolve phlegm from exterior pathogens. The inner bark and root are used as strong emetics and to relieve stubborn constipation. The leaves and berries can be made into poultices with vinegar or honey to relieve damp heat in the skin such as poison ivy.

Elderberry syrup is one of the first things that I reach for when someone is starting to fight a cold or flu. From a Chinese medicine perspective there are two major reasons that we get sick: either our system is weak and susceptible to exterior invasion (Lung qi and wei qi deficiency) or the pathogen is exceptionally strong relative to us (think of plagues). Elderberry helps to strengthen any Lung deficiency condition, giving your immune system a powerful boost. It is antiviral and anti-infective, perfect for fighting off those pesky viruses. The berry also has expectorant, diaphoretic and diuretic properties to help move fluids, the bowels and relieve phlegm. It even helps treat food poisoning. Elderberry is high in calcium, vitamins A, C and B6 and iron—and, best of all, it’s tasty and kids don’t usually mind it.

So how do I use it?
I start to use elderberry tea (often mixed with other teas like berry or nettles) several times a week at the start of school or weather transitions. The syrup is handy for […]

08:15 08:15

13 Tips to Simplify Your Meals

By |2018-05-21T12:38:35+00:00May 20th, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , |Comments Off on 13 Tips to Simplify Your Meals

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

“What’s for dinner?”

It’s a common question that can turn into an amusing (or annoying) game.  When you have a busy schedule it can be a daunting task to figure out how to eat well–let alone eat.  I’ll tell you a little secret–it’s all about habits.

Our culture has put emphasis on economy and convenience, at the cost of  our connection to self nourishment, and I’m not talking about restorative yoga.   Think about it.  We spend less time planning and preparing meals than any other culture in the world, and we have increasing disease and health costs that are directly related to dietary habits.  Diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, GERD (okay, there is a virus involved sometimes here, but I assure you, if you slow down how you eat, it improves considerably), kidney stones, ulcers, gout, heart disease–you get the picture.  We all know nutrition is important, what and how we eat is the basis for our energy, ability to health and overall health.

Wonderful.  So how do we start improving how we nourish ourselves?

Simple-create new habits that make better nourishment and eating habits a priority.

You will be hungry today, so why let that surprise you?  Why not plan for it instead? Your health and soul will thank you.   Let’s play with a few ideas.

1. Create time–If your current habits don’t allow you the time to menu plan, shop, prep and cook–budget some time.  Put it in your day planner or on your ‘to do’ list.  If you skip meals, put the time for them in your planner as well.  It usually takes me about 15 minutes to make a menu for the week and […]

07:54 07:54

Rent Space At Pulse!

By |2018-04-18T09:54:48+00:00April 18th, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Community Announcements & Events|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Rent Space At Pulse!

Rent Our Space!

Bright, clean and peaceful office space for a healing professional. Ideal for life coaches, counselor, therapists, ND, one on one yoga or other healthcare professionals. Ideal for established practitioners.  Fabulous downtown location in Boise’s Historic North End with quick access to downtown and the connector. Space features fully furnished room, reception area, large meeting space and kitchen space.

About Pulse

Boise’s longest running holistic health care practice, Pulse is a group of independent Holistic healthcare practitioners offering a variety of modalities and skills.  Our vision is to help you and your family maintain or improve on your health and wellbeing at any age or stage of life. In illness, Holistic healthcare modalities focus on  maximizing the body’s own natural ability to heal by treating the root of the condition to alleviate symptoms and provide long-term freedom from illness.

Call for more details or for a tour. 208.955.8272

Rent by hour or by day.

$18- by hour
$200 – 1 day week
$325 – 2 days week
$410 – 3 days week
$450 – 4 days week

Includes:

Fabulous downtown location
WiFi & Utilities
Website & Online presence
Furnished room with linens
Handicap access
Reception & conference space
Kitchen space

11:45 11:45

Simple Steps for Dealing with Allergies

By |2018-04-09T10:09:25+00:00April 8th, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Red, itchy eyes, sore throat, sinus congestion, running nose, puffy face, congested ears, swollen lips, headaches. Although it may be true that certain seasons have a propensity to bombard us with excess pollen, or air particulates from farming, and pollution there isn’t really one season for allergies. Some people only suffer during a spring and/or autumn season while others may suffer all year long. Some people are allergic to only one thing, while others suffer from a multitude or combination of allergens. Whatever the individual pattern, it is estimated that nearly 50 million Americans suffer from allergies. It’s estimated that over-the-counter sales of allergies medicines should reach $14.7 billion dollars in 2015–that’s a lot of sneezing and muzzy headedness.

I used to believe that seasonal allergies were coming earlier every year.  Though this may be partly true, what I now see in my practice is that Boise’s air quality is declining enough that clients are suffering more and often longer with allergies–crud.

Allergies in the eyes of western medicine

Allergic rhinitis, or hay fever, is an example of compromised immunity. Basically, the immune system has a hyper response to a strong pathogen (pollen, an abundance of cat dander, etc) and this causes a rapid physiological changes resulting in itchy eyes and throat, sinus congestion, sneezing, asthma and even diarrhea.  Exposure to an allergen would cause a massive release of IgE antibodies which attach to white blood cells known as mast cells. These cells are mostly located in the lungs and upper respiratory tract, the lining of the stomach and the skin. When these cells are stimulated, they release a number of chemicals including histamine which produce the allergic symptoms.
An […]

09:00 09:00

Spring’s Energetics–The Season Of The Wood Element

By |2018-05-31T13:42:07+00:00March 6th, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Spring, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Welcome to Spring!

When does Spring really begin? For most Western cultures, we correlate the start of Spring with the Spring equinox, around March 20-21st.  But all of us know that Spring has been well underway by the time the equinox pops up. If you look at the seasonal correspondences in Chinese medicine’s Yin/Yang theory, the Winter solstice marks the depth of Winter, yet as soon as we reach maximum Yin (the shortest day of the year), Yang and light start to return–literally, Spring is on its way.  A quick look at the lunar calendar can also help us understand why Spring seems to come early or late from one year to the next.  The Chinese New Year heralds the start of the Spring festivals and planting seasons.  This holiday falls on the second new moon after the Winter solstice, sometime between the end of January and the middle of February.

Our bodies feel seasonal changes, and when we are in harmony with these shifts we can delight in the blessings of the season.  However, the transition from Winter to Spring is perhaps, the most tumultuous transition. It’s a duel between the quiet and restive inward energy of Winter into the strong, upward ascending of Yang energy–and its energy can be big.  The season of the Wood element, Spring is a time of tremendous energy, and excitement in the world and in our bodies.   It’s a time of change and growth.  Our bodies want to move more, we have more energy within us and we want to get up and go!  In disharmony, we resist the changes and encounter difficulties.  During the Spring this can […]

06:50 06:50

Give the Gift of Health

By |2017-11-01T15:15:58+00:00October 25th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Community Announcements & Events|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

 

The Gift of Health

What could be better than the gift of wellbeing and health?

Pulse has gift certificates available!

Purchase them for a particular service or practitioner or purchase one for any amount with any practitioner. 

Give them to friends and family…or yourself.

Buy online here or call 208.955.8272 !

13:10 13:10

12 Tips For Handling Heartburn And Indigestion

By |2017-09-22T08:56:06+00:00September 20th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Digestive disturbances affect nearly everyone at some point in their life and it’s estimated that 40% of Americans will suffer from heartburn at least once each month–ouch.  In fact, the proton pump inhibitor drugs (think Nexium and Prevacid) are the third largest class of drugs sold in America each year.    The following recommendations are beneficial for any level of digestive vibrancy, whether you have excellent digestion and want to make the most of a healthy system or you are treating chronic or debilitating digestive issues.  Honestly, I know of no condition that will not improve or benefit from the simple habits listed below.

Chew your food —Let’s start at the beginning.  Besides the teeth mechanically breaking down the food, salivary amylase is added in the mouth to break down starches.  This enzyme is not found in the stomach–it has to be added into the food in the mouth.  Although the stomach churns to help break food down, it doesn’t have teeth and large chunks of food overly burden the stomach causing gas, bloating, and acid re-flux.   The physical act of chew also triggers mass peristalsis in the colon–meaning you will move your bowels more regularly.  Ideally, you should chew your food about 30 times, so put your fork down between each bite and savor your food.

Have a seat–“Li proceeds Qi.” Literally, where your intention goes your Qi (energy & manifestation)  will follow.  If your intention is to eat a meal, assist your body by sitting down, relaxing and enjoying your food.  If your attention is rushed or focused elsewhere Qi won’t readily flow into your digestive organs to help properly transform the food. Voila–you now have […]

15:26 15:26

When Yang Collapses–Rebuilding The Fires

By |2018-05-31T13:41:58+00:00February 11th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions|Tags: , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP

Yang collapse–sound pretty severe, right? In Chinese medicine it is–and it’s often a long, slow and difficult hill to climb for recovery.  Why? Literally, you have burnt out the fire and transformative functions in the body.  Most importantly, clients who have reached deep Yang deficiency are notoriously bad about resting– which is essential to rebuilding Yang.

How deficiencies arise

You played too hard. You became severely ill. You didn’t eat or rest appropriately.  You were under too much stress.  Sometimes we can narrow it down and find one thing that may have caused the collapse but most often it’s a number things that combined leading to eventual collapse. There are many avenues in which the body takes impact of stress, illness and daily living, and when we are vital and healthy we bounce back. Overtime, however, we may continue to dwindle and signs of deficiency will show up.  It’s a progressive process that left unchecked will get worse and worse until something gives way.

The progression of deficiency in the body

Qi Deficiency–Qi deficiency is the starting place. Fortunately, Qi deficiency, though common, is very easy to recover from.  You’re a bit tired, worn out from the day, nothing that a good night’s sleep and some appropriate rest can’t fix.   There will be little change in the tongue, and the pulses will feel a little weak, but you will recover quickly.  Find out more about building Qi here.

Yin or Yang?–Left unchecked, Qi deficiency will progress, leading down a path of either Yin or Yang deficiency. Which path you follow depends on life circumstances, constitution, pre-existing weaknesses and other factors.  Truly, both Yin and Yang are going to […]

15:42 15:42

Amma Therapy

By |2018-10-18T12:04:22+00:00June 13th, 2016|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on Amma Therapy

What is Amma Therapy?

A classical form of Asian bodywork that predates acupuncture, “Amma” is the oldest Chinese word to describe bodywork or massage.  Chinese medicine is made up of three broad branches: Acupuncture, Herbs (includes nutrition) and Bodywork forms.  There are many forms of Asian bodywork such as Tui Na and Shiatsu.  Amma therapy is one form of Asian bodywork, descended through the lineage of a Korean born Tina Sohn (Kim).    The Amma therapist is highly trained in the principles of  Chinese Medicine including; Yin/Yang theory, 5 Element Theory, Organ theory, tongue and pulse diagnosis, holistic nutrition and food energetics. Like Acupuncture, Amma Therapy focuses on moving Qi (energy) in the body by accessing acu-points along the energetic channels. Where the acupuncturist would use needles, the Amma Therapist uses their fingers to manipulate these points.  This combined with a deep, circular, therapeutic massage technique, balances energy in the body and promotes healing at the root level.  The Amma therapist relies on their strength and sensitivity of hands, questioning and other assessment skills to give them continual feedback during treatment.

What can Amma do for you?
In ancient China, you did not pay your doctor while you were ill–you paid them while you were well–what a different medicine model.

At its best, Amma is a fantastic form of integrative holistic healthcare.  Amma is excellent for patients of all ages for both prevention and treatment of disease. It is a very powerful tool in addressing specific illnesses including difficult and chronic diseases.  Amma Therapy (acupressure/massage) has been used successfully to treat and/or manage conditions such as sprains, strains, and fractures; chronic disorders such as arthritis, hypertension, diabetes, gastrointestinal diseases, circulatory problems, anxiety, depression, gynecological problems, premenstrual problems, peri-menopause, menopausal considerations, […]

09:52 09:52

Nate’s Spring Special

By |2018-05-31T13:42:05+00:00April 14th, 2016|Categories: Specials|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Give your system the support it needs this spring with regular Amma Therapy, gua sha, fire cupping, or food energetics and nutritional guidance for your specific needs and goals.

Here’s a deal to help get you back on track:

4 Amma Therapy treatments for the price of 3!    

That’s 4 sessions with Nate for $195.  

Buy now before May 15th and use your appointments when you like.  Use one a month, use two in a week–it’s up to you. Share them with your family member.

Limit 2 packages per client.

Book appointments online here.