09:00 09:00

Spring’s Energetics–The Season Of The Wood Element

By | 2018-05-31T13:42:07+00:00 March 6th, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Spring, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Spring’s Energetics–The Season Of The Wood Element

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Welcome to Spring!

When does Spring really begin? For most Western cultures, we correlate the start of Spring with the Spring equinox, around March 20-21st.  But all of us know that Spring has been well underway by the time the equinox pops up. If you look at the seasonal correspondences in Chinese medicine’s Yin/Yang theory, the Winter solstice marks the depth of Winter, yet as soon as we reach maximum Yin (the shortest day of the year), Yang and light start to return–literally, Spring is on its way.  A quick look at the lunar calendar can also help us understand why Spring seems to come early or late from one year to the next.  The Chinese New Year heralds the start of the Spring festivals and planting seasons.  This holiday falls on the second new moon after the Winter solstice, sometime between the end of January and the middle of February.

Our bodies feel seasonal changes, and when we are in harmony with these shifts we can delight in the blessings of the season.  However, the transition from Winter to Spring is perhaps, the most tumultuous transition. It’s a duel between the quiet and restive inward energy of Winter into the strong, upward ascending of Yang energy–and its energy can be big.  The season of the Wood element, Spring is a time of tremendous energy, and excitement in the world and in our bodies.   It’s a time of change and growth.  Our bodies want to move more, we have more energy within us and we want to get up and go!  In disharmony, we resist the changes and encounter difficulties.  During the Spring this can […]

15:47 15:47

Chilled Sour Cherry Soup

By | 2016-12-29T12:24:13+00:00 April 7th, 2016|Categories: April's Blogs, Dairy Free, Desserts & Sweets, Diabetes Friendly, Gluten Free, Recipes, Seasonal Recipes, Soups and Stew, Spring, Spring Recipes|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Chilled Sour Cherry Soup

Europeans have a long used fruits in soups.  It’s more than an elegant dessert or appetizer, it’s a fantastic way to use up summer’s abundance or ‘less than perfect’ fruit.  This soup is wonderful with fresh or frozen cherries.  You can use dried cherries in a pinch, but reduce the sugar and increase your simmering time until the cherries are soft–enjoy!

April

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11:03 11:03

Windy Conditions

By | 2018-05-31T13:42:04+00:00 March 31st, 2016|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Spring|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Windy Conditions

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT. NCCAOM CI & CP, CHN

It’s a blustery day!

Each of the 5 Seasons in Chinese medicine has a climatic nature that it corresponds to.  Summer relates to Heat, Autumn to Dryness, Winter to Cold, Late Summer  (the transition of seasons) relates to Dampness, and Spring corresponds to Wind. These climates are simply part of the  nature of the season, and people may be more vulnerable to these climatic conditions, and each can manifest as a series of patterns in the body.  What I pay attention to, as Chinese medicine practitioner and Amma Therapist, is how these may manifest in the body.  Ah…here comes the Wind.   Whipping through the tops of the trees, windy patterns may arise in our bodies as colds, allergies, ticks, stiff necks and more.  In Chinese medicine, Wind corresponds to Spring season and the Liver and Gall Bladder channel, and most Springs are windy.  But Wind can invade in any season, and Wind often picks up again in the Autumn.

Wind can be an exterior or interior pattern

Exterior pathogens (Wind, Hot, Cold, Dry, Damp, Summer Heat ) invade our bodies either because the pathogen is excessively strong compared to normal Wei Qi (immunity), think of plagues and virulent viruses–OR–the body is too week to fend off the invasion.   This is the pattern that appears in people who seem to get sick at the drop of a hat.

Interior patterns are generated by disharmonies within the body.  Eating too many hot foods can damage the Yin (cooling) of the body and lead to heat.  Although there may be a bit of overlap, the treatment focus of interior vs exterior will be different.  Read more on exterior and interior […]

12:16 12:16

Minted Pea Soup

By | 2018-05-31T13:42:38+00:00 April 29th, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Gluten Free, Lentils and Legumes, Recipes, Soups and Stew, Spring, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian|Tags: , , |Comments Off on Minted Pea Soup

Pea soup? Oh, yes! Peas are high in minerals, vitamin C, D, protein and folic acid. And they are simply delicious in bright and lively soup.  This soup is beautiful for spring as it contains several foods that specifically prevent or treat spring maladies.  Peas, cool and enter the Liver, Stomach, Spleen and Heart, relieving congestion and aiding Qi flow. The warm pungents (onion family) drain phlegm and clear the sinuses and aid digestion.  Mint, a cool pungent, also treats sinuses and Lung and Liver patterns. For additional color garnish with fresh chive blossoms.

Enjoy!

April

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Minted Pea Soup – – onion (diced), leek (cleaned and diced), scallions (diced), olive oil, garlic (crushed), peas (fresh is ideal!), vegetable or chicken stock, chives, fresh mint (crushed), salt and pepper (to taste), fresh cream, In large sauce pan sauté onions, leek and scallions in olive oil until onions are translucent. Add garlic and peas and sauté for 2 more minutes. Add stock and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.  

Add chives and mint and cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and transfer to blender (or use an immersion blender) puree until smooth. Add salt and pepper to taste and garnish with a dollop of cream and fresh chives.

 ; – Health benefits: <a href="http://www.pulseholistichealth.com/living-with-the-seasons/merry-mints-healing-energetics-mint/">Mint</a> is abundant in the Spring and with good reason, their medicinal properties are numerous and particularly beneficial to many Spring maladies from <a href="http://aprilcrowell.com/blogs/its-all-in-your-head-treating-headaches-with-chinese-medicine/">headaches </a>to <a href="http://aprilcrowell.com/blogs/the-liver-in-chinese-medicine-controller-of-planning-and-vision/">Liver </a>patterns.. Use them in teas to help lift the spirit, counter allergies and sinus congestion, aid digestion and help calm aggression and tempers that often arise with the season.

Primary season: Spring and Autumn

<a href="http://www.pulseholistichealth.com/nutrition-articles/peas-please-a-…at-an-old-food/">Learn more about Peas!</a> – main course – Main […]