12:41 12:41

Cabin Fever Herbs

By | 2018-05-21T12:40:17+00:00 May 14th, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Herb Spotlights, Herbs & Spices|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Cabin Fever Herbs

Cabin Fever. Climbing the Walls. Temporary Insanity. Common terms that imply agitation, anxiety, restlessness, and a general sense of unsettledness. These symptoms are often experienced in the spring by people who tend to run towards yin deficiency from a Chinese Medicine perspective. Much to my surprise Spring Fever means the opposite of these symptoms and is instead associated with lassitude, apathy, and half heartedness, something I will cover in another article.

The following three formulas all have a sedating affect on the central nervous system but through different mechanisms.

A quick note: with any supplement always consult with a qualified practitioner before taking as undesirable side effects may occur when taken by someone who does not need it.

Lavender – Integrative Therapeutics Lavela WS 1265

Cabin Fever Herbs
Lavender has been cultivated and used for thousands of years as a calming and cleansing herb. Experiential evidence has shown that the fragrance of the flowers soothes the mind and extracts of the flowers and plants can be used to effective clean and purify surfaces and living spaces. A simple search of the web will reveal the myriad of uses that lavender has been put to throughout time, anything from placing satchels of flowers in clothing drawers to deter moths and other insects to placing it in pillows to help calm a person to sleep.

Modern science in seeking to understand why lavender has endured in usage through the ages have studied its actions in the brain and its effect on our body. Study results have shown that in the brain, lavender has effects similar to Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) and Gabapentin, both of which help to regulate the nervous system and provide a sense […]

07:16 07:16

Turmeric–Golden Healing Herb

By | 2018-04-09T10:10:31+00:00 March 22nd, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Herbs & Spices, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on Turmeric–Golden Healing Herb

Tyra Burgess, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM)

 

Turmeric is a prevalent and powerful herb, with a long history of medicinal and culinary uses dating back at least 4000 years.  Rhizoma curcumae longae, is a member of the Zingiberaceae/Ginger family, that is packed with curcumin which gives the root its deep golden yellow color and lead to the name “Indian saffron”.  In Auyruvedic medicine turmeric is called haldi,  and in Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jiang Huang.  There are over 130 species of turmeric and India produces nearly 80% of all turmeric, and many of us know it as a one of the spices, along with coriander and cumin, that make up the loved seasoning curry, but this herb has wonderful medicinal properties that make it well worth having in your cupboard.

Turmeric’s healing properties

Turmeric has a peppery, acrid, warm, and bitter flavor.  Turmeric is helpful to almost every system in the body, and has been researched and used by every modality on the planet. In Eastern medicine, the herb is indicated in the stagnation of blood and Qi. TCM uses it for conditions such as amenorrhea, dysmenorrhea, tumors, and traumatic injury where there is pain and swelling from stagnation.  Ayurvedically, turmeric is used to treat a wide variety of conditions ranging from arthritis to ulcers, gas, hepatitis, diabetes, menstrual issues and to prevent and treat intestinal parasites.

 

With the help of Western Science, it has been determined that there are over 100 isolated components in this miracle plant that are helpful in medicine and powerful in Pharmacology. In Western Herbology, this plant is used as an anti-Inflammatory, antiarthritic, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-septic, antioxidant, topical antibacterial and antifungal, antifertility, hypotensive, anti-atherosclerotic, it has tumor preventing activity, choleretic, stimulates digestive enzymes, a carminative, a hepatoprotective, a nephroprotective, radioprotective, […]

09:23 09:23

Drink More Coffee!

By | 2017-02-28T09:28:24+00:00 February 28th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Herbs & Spices, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Drink More Coffee!

Guest blogger William Habblett

Harmony Landscape and Design, llc

Did you know coffee is good for us? Well, I don’t know about it being ingested; I’m a horticulturist, not a health practitioner, so I will leave that discussion up to you and your health care practitioner. When it comes to the garden and plant beds, coffee grounds can be you and your plant’s new best friend. Not to mention, that it is a great way to recycle coffee grounds if you are not set up for composting in your landscape.

A few years ago, I started listening to people using coffee grounds around their blueberries and other acid loving plants, and they were touting how great their plants were doing. Well, the scientific data doesn’t necessarily support the acidic action to the soil profile. It would most likely only be in the immediate area of the grounds themselves. However, that doesn’t mean that there aren’t some great benefits to laying out the coffee grounds.

Coffee grounds themselves are comprised of nitrogen rich proteins, lipids, fatty acids, and cellulose that are great for your plants and the soil environment that they are added to. Over time, beneficial fungi and bacteria break down the different compounds for plant availability and improve microorganism soil life. It also increases the availability of soil bound nutrients such as phosphorous, zinc and iron –alleviating a common problem in our alkaline soils.

It has also been […]

13:35 13:35

The 8 Branches Of Chinese Medicine

By | 2018-05-22T11:31:59+00:00 March 7th, 2016|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Herbs & Spices, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on The 8 Branches Of Chinese Medicine

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

The Eight Branches represent the areas of one’s life that should be taken into account for maintaining a holistic, preventative lifestyle. They are listed in an ideal hierarchy—literally, what should be practiced regularly to maintain health before moving into more invasive methods to moderate or regain well-being. Here’s a brief overview.

1–Meditation–By meditating we are able to connect with the deepest aspects of our being, and therefore be able to engage in our lives with greater purpose and direction.  It provides the opportunity for deep introspection, creates connection with life and greater space within ourselves. Truly, this is the first step in finding out who you are, why you are here and what you can do.  Regular meditation also has innumerable physical benefits such as lowering blood pressure and helping to manage emotions.

2–Exercise–Appropriate exercise is a key to maintaining body and mind health. Finding the correct exercise for the individual needs is a priority. A lack of exercise or over exercising is also detrimental to overall health. Yang (very active exercise) like vigorous martial arts, power yoga, marathon running and mountain biking, may be appropriate for a person with a strong constitution and physical strength. Yin (restorative and calming exercise) like restorative yoga, and gentle qi gong or t’ai qi are great for those needing to replenish, stretch, and deeply nourish. For the overall healthy individual you need a little a bit of both, but for someone recovering from serious illness, gentle yin activity is the start.

3–Nutrition and Tonic Herbs & Foods–How we nourish ourselves is a direct reflection of our state of conscious health. Choosing foods vibrant in Qi, that are mostly local, organic, sustainable and seasonally […]

10:38 10:38

Back To School–Helping Bolster Your Child’s Immune System

By | 2016-12-29T12:24:15+00:00 July 28th, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Herbs & Spices, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Back To School–Helping Bolster Your Child’s Immune System

Tyra Burgess, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM)

As July creeps into August, my mind and my time is thrown into preparation mode. New clothes, new shoes, book bags, and folders. Did we pick the right school? Did we read enough? Did the math tutoring help, so Suzy Q can feel good and ready when she starts 6th grade?   In all this crazy and commotion, there is a part of back to school that we all need to do, but has no marketing team to tell the world about how essential IT really is! What is IT??? It is preparing our children’s immune systems for the upcoming stress, microbial exposure, and change in environment we call back to school.

At the beginning of each school year our kids systems are subjected to each and every other child’s vacations, vaccinations, swimming hole, swimming pool, cousin Conner, and let’s not start on airplane rides. We rush  into a new schedule, and have a bundle of nerves about the first day. “Are my clothes cool? Will people like me? Will I like my teacher?” are on every child’s mind, and enough for our kids to worry about. Illness should not be an additional worry when a simple investment in your child’s health, more specifically your child’s immune system,  can have  far reaching benefits.   

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) reports that “schools inherently foster the transmission of infections from person to person because they are a group setting in which people are in close contact and share supplies and equipment.” —Read more here.  

In 400 BC Hippocrates said, “Let food be your medicine and let medicine be your food.” Both aspects […]

07:12 07:12

Turmeric Smoothie

By | 2015-08-10T11:12:03+00:00 July 1st, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Herbs & Spices|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Turmeric Smoothie

A simple and nourishing smoothie.

 Turmeric Smoothie – A simple nourishing recipe. – hemp or coconut milk, mango or pineapple (frozen), banana, coconut oil, cinnamon, ginger, turmeric, chia seeds, maca, Blend all ingredients and enjoy.

; Recipe contributed by Tyra Burgess; –

06:56 06:56

Golden Milk

By | 2016-04-07T15:17:23+00:00 July 1st, 2015|Categories: Beverages, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Herbs & Spices, Recipes|Tags: , , |Comments Off on Golden Milk

Warm and calming, Golden Milk is traditionally drank before going to bed. Black pepper, which contains peperine, is added to the drink to help the body better absorb the curcumin in the turmeric.

13:03 13:03

Sabzi Polo Ba Mahi

By | 2015-08-10T11:12:04+00:00 March 4th, 2015|Categories: Gluten Free, Herbs & Spices, Recipes, Sides and Salads, Vegetarian|Tags: , , |Comments Off on Sabzi Polo Ba Mahi

This delightful herbed rice dish, robust with cilantro, parsley, mint and coriander, makes its appearance at Nowruz (the Persian New Year) and is most often accompanied by fried, light fleshed fish.Sabzi Polo Ba Mahi – – Basamati or other long grain rice (rinsed), chives (rinsed and chopped), dill (rinsed and chopped), parsley (rinsed and chopped), corriander (rinsed and chopped), butter, ground saffron (dissolved in 2 T. of water), leeks (cleaned, but left whole), cloves of garlic (unpeeled), water, Prep the rice: Thoroughly wash and drain rice–classic recipes say upto 5 times. In a large pot bring 8 cups of water and 2 T. butter to boil. Add in rice, fluff once to loosen grains and boil for 6 minutes. Pour rice into a colander and rinse once more with warm water. ; Layer rice and herbs: Return the pot to the stove heat 1/2 of remaining butter and 1/2 the dissolved saffron. Build a pyramid of rice, herbs, leeks and garlic. Add one spatula full of rice, followed by a scoop of herbs, followed by a leek and head of garlic. Repeat process until all rice and herbs are utilized. Pour the remaining butter and dissolved saffron over the pyramid. Cover with tight fitting lid, so that no steam escapes.
Cook 10 minutes over medium heat then reduce heat to low and cook 45-50 minutes more or until rice is al dente.

Remove from heat and allow to cool with lid on for 5 minutes.
; –

17:47 17:47

Anna’s Chill Chasing Chai Tea

By | 2016-12-22T17:45:45+00:00 December 1st, 2014|Categories: Beverages, Blogs, Comfort Food, Crock pot, Herbs & Spices, Recipes|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Anna’s Chill Chasing Chai Tea

Anna has made chai for winter and autumn events for years–she just has a magic touch with it.  We managed to tickle it out of her.  Make up a large batch of the chai (leaving out the honey and milk) and store it in your fridge to reheat for daily use or for your next event.  Unlike store bought chai teas, you can control the sweetness here.

 

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11:34 11:34

Honey Spiced Nuts

By | 2016-12-29T12:24:19+00:00 September 10th, 2014|Categories: April's Blogs, Autumn, Blogs, Herbs & Spices, Snacks, Winter|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on Honey Spiced Nuts

Spiced nuts are staple in my kitchen.  I make up a large batch and freeze them. A small bowl is set out on the counter for snacks and we toss them onto salads, over hot grain cereals, into granola or send them off to school for a nutritious snack. This recipe is a general guide, feel free to use your favorite spice combinations or to add in minced candied ginger or dried fruits like cranberries.Honey Spiced Nuts – – mixed nuts (cashews, pecans, walnuts…choose your favorites), honey or maple syrup (start with less and increase to just cover the nuts, to avoid gooey nuts), cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, salt and pepper (to taste), – Healing Benefits: Although nuts will vary in their content of protein, oils, vitamins and minerals we can look at them overall and get the general idea of what they have to offer. As a group nuts build and strengthen the body.  They add on weight and fight deficiencies.  Yin building (fluids and fats) and warming nuts are good for thin, weak and frail types but should be avoided if there is excess dampness, phlegm or yeast.  Too many nuts can scatter the energy making a person feel ungrounded or unfocused.

Primary Season: Autumn and Winter.