10:21 10:21

Surviving Summer Heat

By | 2017-06-30T12:24:09+00:00 June 30th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

We love our Summers and the sunshine here in Boise.  It’s time to be in the garden, rivers and mountains.  The temperature can swing nearly 40 degrees from sun up to sundown, and then there is that spell in July and August where it hangs out above 100 and never seems to cool off—ack, melt.  Occasionally, we spend too much time in the sun, or the season changes so rapidly that we have problems adapting. You may experience a little ‘Summer Heat’ invasion.

Each of the 5 Seasons in Chinese medicine has a climatic nature.  Spring relates to Wind, Autumn to Dryness, Winter to Cold, Late Summer  (the transition of seasons) relates to Dampness, and Summer corresponds to Heat. These climates are simply part of the  nature of the season and Chinese medicine practitioners observe these climatic influences and their behaviors in the body as they can become a source of disease or disharmony.  For example, Wind can be involved in many forms of headaches, allergies and palsies.  Any of these climatic conditions can pop up in any season due to rapid weather changes, change in location, etc.  Heat is most likely to affect us during the Summer and the Summer organs are most vulnerable to Heat, and the 6th Pernicious Influence–Summer Heat.

 Summer Heat is an exterior pathogen

Exterior pathogens or the 6 Pernicious Influences or 6 Evils are hot, cold, wind, damp, dry and summer heat.  They are acute in nature and come on quickly. They invade our bodies either because the pathogen is excessively strong compared to normal Wei Qi (immunity), like in the cases of plagues,  or our Wei Qi is too […]

10:11 10:11

Sunomono (Cucumber Salad With Seaweed And Sesame)

By | 2017-06-30T12:36:48+00:00 June 30th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Recipes, Sides and Salads, Summer Recipes, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Sunomono (Cucumber Salad With Seaweed And Sesame)

Cucumbers are perfect for handling summer’s heat.  Sunomono is a classic Japanese summer salad of cucumbers in vinegar with numerous variation.

Enjoy!

AprilSunomono (Cucumber Salad With Seaweed And Sesame) – – cucumber (cut in to 1/2 inch quarters), rice wine vinegar, nori or light seaweed (crumbled), sesame seed (black or brown), water, sugar (if needed), Slice and quarter the cucumber to desired bit sizes.
In a medium bowl, combine vinegar, water, seaweed, seeds and sugar. Pour over cucumbers until thoroughly coated. Serve chilled.; –

13:10 13:10

12 Tips For Handling Heartburn And Indigestion

By | 2017-06-29T12:17:29+00:00 June 29th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Digestive disturbances affect nearly everyone at some point in their life and it’s estimated that 40% of Americans will suffer from heartburn at least once each month–ouch.  In fact, the proton pump inhibitor drugs (think Nexium and Prevacid) are the third largest class of drugs sold in America each year.    The following recommendations are beneficial for any level of digestive vibrancy, whether you have excellent digestion and want to make the most of a healthy system or you are treating chronic or debilitating digestive issues.  Honestly, I know of no condition that will not improve or benefit from the simple habits listed below.

Chew your food —Let’s start at the beginning.  Besides the teeth mechanically breaking down the food, salivary amylase is added in the mouth to break down starches.  This enzyme is not found in the stomach–it has to be added into the food in the mouth.  Although the stomach churns to help break food down, it doesn’t have teeth and large chunks of food overly burden the stomach causing gas, bloating, and acid re-flux.   The physical act of chew also triggers mass peristalsis in the colon–meaning you will move your bowels more regularly.  Ideally, you should chew your food about 30 times, so put your fork down between each bite and savor your food.

Have a seat–“Li proceeds Qi.” Literally, where your intention goes your Qi (energy & manifestation)  will follow.  If your intention is to eat a meal, assist your body by sitting down, relaxing and enjoying your food.  If your attention is rushed or focused elsewhere Qi won’t readily flow into your digestive organs to help properly transform the food. Voila–you now have […]

15:12 15:12

How Needle-less Acupuncture Works

By | 2017-05-30T13:34:46+00:00 May 25th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Specials|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Needle-less acupuncture, much like traditional acupuncture, works to regulate the body’s Qi. We use a unique device that uses electric-pressure sparking (like that used in electronic lighters) to create a low electronic pulse that is painless yet effective.

So how does it work? Needle-less acupuncture is based on the electric current principle and the body’s bio-electricity. Faint but measurable amounts of electricity are produced by the heart, the brain, by individual cells, and even further yet by muscular contraction. The device emits a low voltage spark caused by the friction of two crystals.

This spark travels through the cells, muscles and energetic meridians of the body to regulate the body’s energetic balance. If the body’s energy flow is sluggish, the device will be a catalyst to speed it up, and if the energy in the meridian is excessive, the treatment will slow it down. Needle-less acupuncture has been shown to have great success in the treatment of joint-pain, stiff muscles, neuralgia, stress, headaches, insomnia as well as many other chronic conditions.

Shawn Harris is now seeing clients at Pulse Holistic Health.

Check out his introductory offer and find out more here.

10:04 10:04

Shawn Harris- $50 New Client Special Offer

By | 2017-05-26T15:47:52+00:00 May 24th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Community Announcements & Events|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

Pulse welcomes Shawn Harris, acupuncturist in training and Asian medicine practitioner.  

Shawn is currently pursuing his doctorate in acupuncture and oriental medicine further specializing in neuromuscular medicine, auricular medicine, women’s health, and endocrinology. While finishing his doctorate he is pursuing his board certification in oriental medicine and state licensure from National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM).

You may have already met or seen Shawn around Pulse as April has been proctoring some of his final training.  While preparing to take his Idaho Board Certification for Acupuncture later this summer, Shawn offers treatments in needle-less acupuncture, acupressure, oriental bodywork therapy, auricular diagnosis with ear seeds, cupping and guasha, and herbal recommendations.

New client offer

$50 one hour session

Offer good now through August 1st.

Services offered: Needle-less acupuncture, acupressure, Oriental bodywork, auricular diagnosis and treatment, cupping and/or gua sha and herbs. Shawn will be offering acupuncture soon.

Offer good with Shawn Harris only. Offer applies to first time clients only.

How To Book With Shawn

Shawn is an independent practitioner and manages his own bookings and clientele. Appointments are currently available Monday, Wednesdays and Fridays.  Other times may be available upon request.  Email Shawn at dr.shawnharris@gmail.com. or connect via my professional Facebook page or call Pulse at 955.8272.

Find out more about Shawn here. 

 

09:05 09:05

Nourishing With Stinging Nettles

By | 2017-05-24T09:54:53+00:00 May 24th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Stinging nettles sting.

My first encounter with nettles was not pleasant, and at the time, I didn’t know enough to look for lamb’s quarter or dock to soothe the nettle’s sharp bite.  Instead, I chose to run screaming back to camp seeking my mother’s aid to treat the flaming red blisters on my legs.

Despite my first meeting with nettles, I have grown to love their amazing nutritional and healing properties.  They are one of the few herbs that I can recommend to almost anyone–young, old, weak, strong, nursing mothers and athletes.  To date, I  haven’t come up with someone that can’t benefit from nettles.

A bit of nettle history

Nettles have a long history of medicinal use–dating back to the bronze age. Native Americans used them to stop bleeding after child birth, Victorian women used nettle tinctures to thicken their hair.  Soups were used to build strength and stamina–the list is long as you will see below.

Nettles grow wild across Europe, America and parts of Canada. Many people harvest them fresh, but for ease (possibly I’m just lazy) I get my nettles dried and in bulk unless a local grower has some fresh available.   I use them regularly for my family, self and my clients.  All parts of the nettle plant have medicinal properties earning them a place of honor in my herbal cupboard.

Western uses and nutritional profile

Long inhale and go….  Asthma, chronic cough, any lung disorder, hives, shingles, eczema, diabetes, uterine bleeding, chronic nose bleeds, allergies, gout, heart failure, spasms urinary and kidney stones, urinary tract infections,  strengthen hair, heal wounds, replenishing after surgery, fluid retention, rheumatism, arthritis,  reduce edema and bloating, build teeth and bones, balance mood swings, […]

08:15 08:15

13 Tips to Simplify Your Meals

By | 2017-05-10T08:46:18+00:00 May 8th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

“What’s for dinner?”

It’s a common question that can turn into an amusing (or annoying) game.  When you have a busy schedule it can be a daunting task to figure out how to eat well–let alone eat.  I’ll tell you a little secret–it’s all about habits.

Our culture has put emphasis on economy and convenience, at the cost of  our connection to self nourishment, and I’m not talking about restorative yoga.   Think about it.  We spend less time planning and preparing meals than any other culture in the world, and we have increasing disease and health costs that are directly related to dietary habits.  Diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, GERD (okay, there is a virus involved sometimes here, but I assure you, if you slow down how you eat, it improves considerably), kidney stones, ulcers, gout, heart disease–you get the picture.  We all know nutrition is important, what and how we eat is the basis for our energy, ability to health and overall health.

Wonderful.  So how do we start improving how we nourish ourselves?

Simple-create new habits that make better nourishment and eating habits a priority.

You will be hungry today, so why let that surprise you?  Why not plan for it instead? Your health and soul will thank you.   Let’s play with a few ideas.

1. Create time–If your current habits don’t allow you the time to menu plan, shop, prep and cook–budget some time.  Put it in your day planner or on your ‘to do’ list.  If you skip meals, put the time for them in your planner as well.  It usually takes me about 15 minutes to make a menu for the week and […]

08:10 08:10

Grilled Ratatouille

By | 2017-05-08T08:31:25+00:00 May 8th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Gluten Free, Recipes, Summer, Summer Recipes, The Seasons, Vegetables, Vegetarian|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on Grilled Ratatouille

Summer cooking at its best is easy, colorful and uncomplicated.  Ratatouille makes the most of the season’s vegetables like tomatoes, eggplants and peppers.  This grilled version can be prepared in two ways.  The vegetables are first grilled and you then dress them right at the table and serve them immediately or you finish marrying their flavors over the stove top.  Both are delish–it’s just a matter of choice.  I tend to prefer the first method, as it’s simpler and doesn’t heat up the kitchen.

Double this recipes or toss leftovers with cooked quinoa and a little extra dressing (if necessary) for a light, high protein dish. […]

09:06 09:06

Vitajuwel Water bottles

By | 2017-05-24T10:20:18+00:00 May 1st, 2017|Categories: Blogs|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

 

Need a unique gift for a special occasion?

How about a Vitajuwel bottle that nourishes her with water that becomes fresh like it comes from the spring.

Choose a bottle with gemstones that change the molecular structure of the water!

Call us to come in and check them out. 208-955-8272

08:44 08:44

Digestion And A Happy Gut-Food As Medicine

By | 2017-03-30T08:44:10+00:00 March 30th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions|Tags: , , , , , , , |0 Comments

Carla Kyle, Dipl ABT, NCCAOM  Senior Healing Qigong Instructor

A friend of mine for some mysterious reason found that every winter her daily poop quota fell short, most particularly on the weekends. She eventually discovered that nixing her energy bars on the weekend, she could get the job done! Such a simple thing, yet one that caused severe discomfort year after year. Most energy bars contain a combination of dried fruits, dry oatmeal, dry chia seeds, dry roasted nuts all baked together – you get the picture? Desert dry Internal conditions can come from the foods we eat.

Fortunately for those of us seeking tummy and gut comfort after months or years of system malfunction, we can return to Food as Medicine. This is the idea that you can begin to add in more helpful foods and let go of the less helpful foods that are plaguing your tummy and plugging, or, overflowing your pipes.

The following information is a picture of what a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioner looks at when considering a course of food therapy for YOU, You may be doing A LOT of these things already. Don’t be discouraged! This is where the system of TCM food therapy shows its worth. TCM providers look at your tongue and read your pulses to discern where YOUR underlying disharmony is coming from. You may be surprised to find out how a few small changes can make a huge difference!

What takes place during a Traditional Chinese Medicine visit?

  • The nature of what you eat is discussed during your visit.
  • Your tongue is looked at and read, your pulse is read in the 3 positions and 3 levels
  • Your elemental nature becomes apparent with talk, channel palpation, […]