18:23 18:23

Stout-hearted Beef Stew

By |2018-11-12T13:54:47+00:00November 8th, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Comfort Food, Crock pot, Meat and Fish, Winter|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Stout-hearted Beef Stew

This is a rich and deeply nourishing dish that is perfect for cold winter days.  The sweetness of the prunes is perfectly offset by the stout and pairs with the rich earthiness of the onion and carrot.  Serve it over mashed potatoes or wilt some fresh greens into your bowl!

Contributed by Nathan MandigoStout-hearted Beef Stew – This is a rich and deeply nourishing dish that is perfect for cold winter days. The sweetness of the prunes is perfectly offset by the stout and pairs with the rich earthiness of the onion and carrot. Serve it over mashed potatoes or wilt some fresh greens into your bowl. – onion (thinly sliced), garlic (minced or pressed), carrots (cut into 1/4 in clices), parsely (finely chopped), bay leaf, prunes (pitted), boneless beef chuck (1 inch cubes), flour, black pepper, stout or dark ale (for a brothier soup, use the whole bottle), , In a 3 quart or larger electric slow cooker, combine onion, garlic, carrots, parsley, bay leaf and prunes.; Coat beef cubes with flour, then add to cooker and sprinkle with pepper. Pour in stout. Cover and cook on low setting until beef is very tender when pierced (8 to 9 hours); Before serving, skim off excess fat, if necessary. Season with salt to taste.; ; – – main course – Main Dish – Soup & Stew – soups and stews – American – Blogs – Comfort Food – Crock pot – Meat and Fish – Winter – beef stew – Blood building – comfort foods – Crock pot recipes

11:22 11:22

Warm To The Core

By |2018-11-08T12:31:36+00:00November 7th, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, The Seasons, Winter|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Baby, it’s cold outside.  Now that you have an ear worm to pester you for the day, let’s talk about keeping the core of the body warm.

The Asian cultures have a long tradition of dressing to protect the abdomen and the lower back and with good reason–the Kidneys.  Called the “Root of Life” in Chinese medicine, and their energies and organs are greatly protected in classical Asian medicine and martial arts.   In Japanese, the region is called the Hara, in Chinese it’s the Dan Tian. All Asian cultures hold the same concept–the vital energy of the body is centered in the space  located just behind the belly button to between the two kidneys.   If you’ve ever done martial arts, this where you move from.  It’s your core,  and the store house of energy and we want to keep it warm.

The Kidneys are the “Root of Life” and “Sealed Storage”

Let me see if I can boil down a 5 hour lecture into a couple of simple paragraphs.

All organs have a Yin and Yang aspect, however, these two aspects take on a different meaning with the Kidneys.  The Kidneys are the foundation for all Yin and Yang for all organs. One of the first channels to develop as a baby grows, Kidney Yin is the foundation or “root” for the Yin and the Yang organs alike, making it the basis for Fire and Water in the body.  If the Kidney energy is strong, the baby will grow strong and have vitality.  Kidney energy is required for all growth, maturation and reproduction– the bones, marrow, and spine;  and […]

09:33 09:33

Elderberry Syrup and Tea for Colds and Flu

By |2018-11-08T12:52:28+00:00November 2nd, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Elderberry Syrup and Tea for Colds and Flu

As Autumn creeps in I stock my cupboards with a few items to prevent and treat colds and flu. Gan Mao Ling, Kwan Loong oil, vitamin C, Immustim or Wellness Formula, to name a few, but one of my favorites is simple and reliable elderberry tea and syrup.

All parts of the elder plant have a long history in folk medicine. The flower is used to promote sweating and resolve phlegm from exterior pathogens. The inner bark and root are used as strong emetics and to relieve stubborn constipation. The leaves and berries can be made into poultices with vinegar or honey to relieve damp heat in the skin such as poison ivy.

Elderberry syrup is one of the first things that I reach for when someone is starting to fight a cold or flu. From a Chinese medicine perspective there are two major reasons that we get sick: either our system is weak and susceptible to exterior invasion (Lung qi and wei qi deficiency) or the pathogen is exceptionally strong relative to us (think of plagues). Elderberry helps to strengthen any Lung deficiency condition, giving your immune system a powerful boost. It is antiviral and anti-infective, perfect for fighting off those pesky viruses. The berry also has expectorant, diaphoretic and diuretic properties to help move fluids, the bowels and relieve phlegm. It even helps treat food poisoning. Elderberry is high in calcium, vitamins A, C and B6 and iron—and, best of all, it’s tasty and kids don’t usually mind it.

So how do I use it?
I start to use elderberry tea (often mixed with other teas like berry or nettles) several times a week at the start of school or weather transitions. The syrup is handy for […]

10:13 10:13

Tyra’s Blood Building Stew

By |2018-11-08T12:55:47+00:00November 1st, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Crock pot, Recipes, Seasonal Recipes, Soups and Stew, Winter Recipes|Tags: , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Tyra’s Blood Building Stew

A wintertime favorite of Tyra’s that is deeply nourishing and warming.

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12:00 12:00

Mexican Cocoa

By |2018-09-27T11:34:14+00:00September 14th, 2018|Categories: Blogs|Comments Off on Mexican Cocoa

Mexican Cocoa – – unsweetened cocoa powder, cinnamon, cayenne, chili powder, milk of choice (almond, soy or other nut milk. You can also substitute for Irish Creme or a coffee-liqueur), maple syrup, agave or honey (optional–you may not need a sweetener if you milk is sweet), Silver tequila (optional), paprika, cinnamon stick, , Prep the spices: In a saucepan over low heat add the cocoa powder, cinnamon, cayenne and chili. Toast until fragrant about 2 minutes–be careful to not burn the spices and cocoa.; Add the liquds: Slowly pour in milk, whisking gently, until fulling incorporated. Increase heat to medium and bring mixture to a low simmer. Blend in sweetener and remove from heat. ; Prep your mug: Rim a mug with paprika by first dipping the mug rim in a shallow saucer of water then into a saucer of paprika. Add tequila to mug and pour in hot cocoa mixture. Garnish with cinnamon stick and enjoy.; ; – – Blogs

12:04 12:04

Wild Products!

By |2018-08-16T12:26:24+00:00August 16th, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Herb Spotlights|Comments Off on Wild Products!

Now carrying Wild Foods products at Pulse! 

Chocolate Powder & Cocoa Nibs

  • Raw & unprocessed from organically grown cocoa beans.
  • Full of Antioxidants, Flavonoids (more than green tea, blueberries and red wine) Fiber, Protein, Vitamins and Minerals, Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, Calcium, Copper, Potassium, Chromium and Phosphorus.

Great for baking, hot chocolate, smoothies, coffee…you name it!

Lions Mane

  • “Raw superfood mushroom extracts help protect DNA oxidation while promoting overall well-being and mood. Use to support health, increase concentration, reduce anxiety and increase overall feelings of happiness.”
  • Considered a nootropic as it increases the amount of nerve growth function in the brain.
  • Antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Supports immune system.

Sip Wild Shrooms hot—like hot chocolate—or blend it with butter coffee brews and protein shakes or smoothies. You can also put in capsules!

Power Shroom Blend

  • Mushroom Blend Of Reishi, Chaga And Cordyceps.
  • Builds overall immune system.
  • Tonifies Lungs, Kidneys, & Spleen.

Mix 1/2 TSP in warm water, tea, coffee, smoothies or shakes. You can also use this powder to make your own capsules. 

12:52 12:52

Bitter – The Flavor of The Fire Element

By |2018-07-24T12:24:32+00:00July 21st, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Bitter – The Flavor of The Fire Element

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CN

Whoever coined the phrase “bitter hearts” was right.  Bitter is the flavor that goes directly to the Heart.   Bitter. Even its name can make us cringe, and it’s certainly not the most popular of the 5 Flavors (sweet, sour, pungent, and salty) yet it serves a vital role in our health.   The flavor is a powerful mover and enters the Heart, Small Intestines, Triple Warmer and Pericardium–all the Fire organs.  When the Fire element is in-balance we are joyful and can act on life plans, we make meaningful relationships and set appropriate boundaries–engage!

Still frowning?  You don’t need a lot of bitter, so just play along for a bit.

Bitter flavors enter the Heart and other Fire Organs

Each of the 5 Elements has numerous correspondences including flavor, season, color, organs, sound and emotion.  Fire and the bitter flavor correspond with the season of Summer, which is unique in that it has four organ systems rather than two like the other elements.  The Heart (Yin), Small Intestines (Yang), Pericardium (Yin) and Triple Warmer (Yang) all belong to the Fire element-and they have a lot going on.  The Heart, as the emperor, sits on his throne and controls the circulation of blood and allows us our most intimate relationships. Heart needs to express its truest self to the world. Small Intestines constantly sorts the ‘pure from the impure’–what to digest and what not to digest–physically, emotionally and spiritually–who do we keep in our lives, who do we need to let go of? A lot of people can get stuck in the process of sorting.  Pericardium has similar properties to the Heart and the Triple Warmer […]

16:48 16:48

Merry Mints–The Healing Energetics of Mint

By |2018-06-11T12:26:58+00:00June 10th, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , |Comments Off on Merry Mints–The Healing Energetics of Mint

Basil, apple, sage and spearmint;

Oregano, catnip, pineapple and peppermint;

To many dishes their flavor they’ve lent;

Yet why is one not called merriment?

Grandma June grew a peppermint bush around the water spigot off her front deck.  Content in its moist, rich soil and shaded in the afternoon, the plant grew to be a monster.  There was no way to reach in and turn on the hose without stirring up the mint’s refreshing fragrance or the bees if the plant was in bloom.  Each year she harvested the mint to make teas or jelly to serve with lamb or give as gifts.

In a burst of sentimentality, I planted a clump of mint next the water tap outside my back door.  It’s an easy grab to add fresh mint to salads and soups or to make refreshing teas, hair rinses and other delights.  And there’s an added bonus–ants hate peppermint.  So if you have a few pests in the spring consider a planting of mint, especially spearmint, lavender and penny royal along your home.

A little mint history

The aromatic presence of the mint family have be pleasing our senses for centuries.  Mints (mentha) are a part of the lamiaceae or labiatae family–which isn’t a small family.    It includes many of our favorite culinary herbs like basil, rosemary, oregano, sage and penny royal.   Honestly, there is a bit of debate in the horticulture world as to what clearly defines the mint family, but most recognize that there at least 25 species of mints and countless hybrids including the fun stuff like pineapple, ginger and chocolate mint.

We can track mint’s usage all the way back to Pliny the Elder in the […]

14:00 14:00

Sunomono (Cucumber Salad With Seaweed And Sesame)

By |2018-06-08T13:00:42+00:00June 8th, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Recipes, Sides and Salads, Summer Recipes, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Sunomono (Cucumber Salad With Seaweed And Sesame)

Cucumbers are perfect for handling summer’s heat.  Sunomono is a classic Japanese summer salad of cucumbers in vinegar with numerous variation.

Enjoy!

AprilSunomono (Cucumber Salad With Seaweed And Sesame) – – cucumber (cut in to 1/2 inch quarters), rice wine vinegar, nori or light seaweed (crumbled), sesame seed (black or brown), water, sugar (if needed), , Slice and quarter the cucumber to desired bit sizes.
In a medium bowl, combine vinegar, water, seaweed, seeds and sugar. Pour over cucumbers until thoroughly coated. Serve chilled.; ; – – salad – side – Asian – Blogs – Recipes – Sides and Salads – Summer Recipes – Vegan – Vegetables – Vegetarian – cucumber salad – cucumbers – Pulse Holistic Health – sunomon

10:44 10:44

Middle Eastern Lemonade

By |2018-06-08T12:58:48+00:00June 6th, 2018|Categories: Beverages, Blogs|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Middle Eastern Lemonade

The special ingredient in this refreshing drink is orange flower water (sometimes called orange blossom water). This distilled essence of orange blossom can be purchased in most well-stocked specialty grocery stores. Most orange blossom water comes from the south of France and from the Levant.

For an adult twist, serve with vodka or gin.

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