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15:12 15:12

How Needle-less Acupuncture Works

By | 2017-05-30T13:34:46+00:00 May 25th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Specials|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Needle-less acupuncture, much like traditional acupuncture, works to regulate the body’s Qi. We use a unique device that uses electric-pressure sparking (like that used in electronic lighters) to create a low electronic pulse that is painless yet effective.

So how does it work? Needle-less acupuncture is based on the electric current principle and the body’s bio-electricity. Faint but measurable amounts of electricity are produced by the heart, the brain, by individual cells, and even further yet by muscular contraction. The device emits a low voltage spark caused by the friction of two crystals.

This spark travels through the cells, muscles and energetic meridians of the body to regulate the body’s energetic balance. If the body’s energy flow is sluggish, the device will be a catalyst to speed it up, and if the energy in the meridian is excessive, the treatment will slow it down. Needle-less acupuncture has been shown to have great success in the treatment of joint-pain, stiff muscles, neuralgia, stress, headaches, insomnia as well as many other chronic conditions.

Shawn Harris is now seeing clients at Pulse Holistic Health.

Check out his introductory offer and find out more here.

10:04 10:04

Shawn Harris- $50 New Client Special Offer

By | 2017-05-26T15:47:52+00:00 May 24th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Community Announcements & Events|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

Pulse welcomes Shawn Harris, acupuncturist in training and Asian medicine practitioner.  

Shawn is currently pursuing his doctorate in acupuncture and oriental medicine further specializing in neuromuscular medicine, auricular medicine, women’s health, and endocrinology. While finishing his doctorate he is pursuing his board certification in oriental medicine and state licensure from National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM).

You may have already met or seen Shawn around Pulse as April has been proctoring some of his final training.  While preparing to take his Idaho Board Certification for Acupuncture later this summer, Shawn offers treatments in needle-less acupuncture, acupressure, oriental bodywork therapy, auricular diagnosis with ear seeds, cupping and guasha, and herbal recommendations.

New client offer

$50 one hour session

Offer good now through August 1st.

Services offered: Needle-less acupuncture, acupressure, Oriental bodywork, auricular diagnosis and treatment, cupping and/or gua sha and herbs. Shawn will be offering acupuncture soon.

Offer good with Shawn Harris only. Offer applies to first time clients only.

How To Book With Shawn

Shawn is an independent practitioner and manages his own bookings and clientele. Appointments are currently available Monday, Wednesdays and Fridays.  Other times may be available upon request.  Email Shawn at dr.shawnharris@gmail.com. or connect via my professional Facebook page or call Pulse at 955.8272.

Find out more about Shawn here. 

 

09:05 09:05

Nourishing With Stinging Nettles

By | 2017-05-24T09:54:53+00:00 May 24th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Stinging nettles sting.

My first encounter with nettles was not pleasant, and at the time, I didn’t know enough to look for lamb’s quarter or dock to soothe the nettle’s sharp bite.  Instead, I chose to run screaming back to camp seeking my mother’s aid to treat the flaming red blisters on my legs.

Despite my first meeting with nettles, I have grown to love their amazing nutritional and healing properties.  They are one of the few herbs that I can recommend to almost anyone–young, old, weak, strong, nursing mothers and athletes.  To date, I  haven’t come up with someone that can’t benefit from nettles.

A bit of nettle history

Nettles have a long history of medicinal use–dating back to the bronze age. Native Americans used them to stop bleeding after child birth, Victorian women used nettle tinctures to thicken their hair.  Soups were used to build strength and stamina–the list is long as you will see below.

Nettles grow wild across Europe, America and parts of Canada. Many people harvest them fresh, but for ease (possibly I’m just lazy) I get my nettles dried and in bulk unless a local grower has some fresh available.   I use them regularly for my family, self and my clients.  All parts of the nettle plant have medicinal properties earning them a place of honor in my herbal cupboard.

Western uses and nutritional profile

Long inhale and go….  Asthma, chronic cough, any lung disorder, hives, shingles, eczema, diabetes, uterine bleeding, chronic nose bleeds, allergies, gout, heart failure, spasms urinary and kidney stones, urinary tract infections,  strengthen hair, heal wounds, replenishing after surgery, fluid retention, rheumatism, arthritis,  reduce edema and bloating, build teeth and bones, balance mood swings, […]

08:15 08:15

13 Tips to Simplify Your Meals

By | 2017-05-10T08:46:18+00:00 May 8th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

“What’s for dinner?”

It’s a common question that can turn into an amusing (or annoying) game.  When you have a busy schedule it can be a daunting task to figure out how to eat well–let alone eat.  I’ll tell you a little secret–it’s all about habits.

Our culture has put emphasis on economy and convenience, at the cost of  our connection to self nourishment, and I’m not talking about restorative yoga.   Think about it.  We spend less time planning and preparing meals than any other culture in the world, and we have increasing disease and health costs that are directly related to dietary habits.  Diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, GERD (okay, there is a virus involved sometimes here, but I assure you, if you slow down how you eat, it improves considerably), kidney stones, ulcers, gout, heart disease–you get the picture.  We all know nutrition is important, what and how we eat is the basis for our energy, ability to health and overall health.

Wonderful.  So how do we start improving how we nourish ourselves?

Simple-create new habits that make better nourishment and eating habits a priority.

You will be hungry today, so why let that surprise you?  Why not plan for it instead? Your health and soul will thank you.   Let’s play with a few ideas.

1. Create time–If your current habits don’t allow you the time to menu plan, shop, prep and cook–budget some time.  Put it in your day planner or on your ‘to do’ list.  If you skip meals, put the time for them in your planner as well.  It usually takes me about 15 minutes to make a menu for the week and […]

08:10 08:10

Grilled Ratatouille

By | 2017-05-08T08:31:25+00:00 May 8th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Gluten Free, Recipes, Summer, Summer Recipes, The Seasons, Vegetables, Vegetarian|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on Grilled Ratatouille

Summer cooking at its best is easy, colorful and uncomplicated.  Ratatouille makes the most of the season’s vegetables like tomatoes, eggplants and peppers.  This grilled version can be prepared in two ways.  The vegetables are first grilled and you then dress them right at the table and serve them immediately or you finish marrying their flavors over the stove top.  Both are delish–it’s just a matter of choice.  I tend to prefer the first method, as it’s simpler and doesn’t heat up the kitchen.

Double this recipes or toss leftovers with cooked quinoa and a little extra dressing (if necessary) for a light, high protein dish. […]

09:06 09:06

Vitajuwel Water bottles

By | 2017-05-24T10:20:18+00:00 May 1st, 2017|Categories: Blogs|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

 

Need a unique gift for a special occasion?

How about a Vitajuwel bottle that nourishes her with water that becomes fresh like it comes from the spring.

Choose a bottle with gemstones that change the molecular structure of the water!

Call us to come in and check them out. 208-955-8272

08:44 08:44

Digestion And A Happy Gut-Food As Medicine

By | 2017-03-30T08:44:10+00:00 March 30th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions|Tags: , , , , , , , |0 Comments

Carla Kyle, Dipl ABT, NCCAOM  Senior Healing Qigong Instructor

A friend of mine for some mysterious reason found that every winter her daily poop quota fell short, most particularly on the weekends. She eventually discovered that nixing her energy bars on the weekend, she could get the job done! Such a simple thing, yet one that caused severe discomfort year after year. Most energy bars contain a combination of dried fruits, dry oatmeal, dry chia seeds, dry roasted nuts all baked together – you get the picture? Desert dry Internal conditions can come from the foods we eat.

Fortunately for those of us seeking tummy and gut comfort after months or years of system malfunction, we can return to Food as Medicine. This is the idea that you can begin to add in more helpful foods and let go of the less helpful foods that are plaguing your tummy and plugging, or, overflowing your pipes.

The following information is a picture of what a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioner looks at when considering a course of food therapy for YOU, You may be doing A LOT of these things already. Don’t be discouraged! This is where the system of TCM food therapy shows its worth. TCM providers look at your tongue and read your pulses to discern where YOUR underlying disharmony is coming from. You may be surprised to find out how a few small changes can make a huge difference!

What takes place during a Traditional Chinese Medicine visit?

  • The nature of what you eat is discussed during your visit.
  • Your tongue is looked at and read, your pulse is read in the 3 positions and 3 levels
  • Your elemental nature becomes apparent with talk, channel palpation, […]
11:58 11:58

Oh, Honey! Bees’ Wonderful Gifts

By | 2017-05-01T09:35:26+00:00 March 24th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Holistic Living|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI, CHN

There are certain pursuits which, if not wholly poetic and true, do at least suggest a nobler and finer relation to nature than we know. The keeping of bees, for instance.  

Henry David Thoreau

I grew up on my grandparent’s farm outside of Caldwell, on Chicken Dinner Road, among vegetable gardens, berry patches, orchards, flower gardens….and bees. Grandpa Herman held many passions but at the top of the list were roses, walnuts and bees.

Grandpa’s bee hives would come to life every spring as soon as the first violets appeared. The apricot and crab apple trees buzzed with life and the melodious hum meant fresh honey. In a few weeks we would be blessed with plates of oozing honeycomb. The honey, gently flavored with whatever was blooming, ranged in color from golds to nearly black was fragrant and delicious. Mmmmm.

A Little History

The collection of honey dates back to 7000 b.c.e., and it shows up in nearly every form of medicine. However, honey fell out of popular use due to the availability and ease of processed white refined sugar. Let’s face it, refined sugar is cheaper and easier to obtain. You don’t have to risk stings or wait for the right season, you don’t have to manage a hive and its queen. Honey also adds a distinct flavor to whatever it goes into, another put-off to spoiled taste buds, but I digress.

Like all real food, bee products hold medicinal properties and energetics–the post metabolic phenomenon of what it does in the body (heat, cool, etc.)– once it is ingested. Here’s a brief picture of our bees’ bounty.

local be [...]
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11:42 11:42

Mini Clafoutis

By | 2017-03-17T14:36:42+00:00 March 17th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Dairy Free, Desserts & Sweets, Diabetes Friendly, Eggs, Fruit, Gluten Free, Recipes, Vegetable|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Clafoutis, a dish popularized in America by Julia Child, are easy to make and endless in variety (see notes).  Just think of them as mini quiches without the crust.  These clafoutis make lovely items for spring brunches as they can be eaten hot or at room temperature.  They are also great little after-school nibble or to pack for a picnic.

Enjoy!  April

[…]

09:00 09:00

Spring’s Energetics–The Season Of The Wood Element

By | 2017-03-16T14:00:27+00:00 March 6th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Spring, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Welcome to Spring!

When does Spring really begin? For most Western cultures, we correlate the start of Spring with the Spring equinox, around March 20-21st.  But all of us know that Spring has been well underway by the time the equinox pops up. If you look at the seasonal correspondences in Chinese medicine’s Yin/Yang theory, the Winter solstice marks the depth of Winter, yet as soon as we reach maximum Yin (the shortest day of the year), Yang and light start to return–literally, Spring is on its way.  A quick look at the lunar calendar can also help us understand why Spring seems to come early or late from one year to the next.  The Chinese New Year heralds the start of the Spring festivals and planting seasons.  This holiday falls on the second new moon after the Winter solstice, sometime between the end of January and the middle of February.

Our bodies feel seasonal changes, and when we are in harmony with these shifts we can delight in the blessings of the season.  However, the transition from Winter to Spring is perhaps, the most tumultuous transition. It’s a duel between the quiet and restive inward energy of Winter into the strong, upward ascending of Yang energy–and its energy can be big.  The season of the Wood element, Spring is a time of tremendous energy, and excitement in the world and in our bodies.   It’s a time of change and growth.  Our bodies want to move more, we have more energy within us and we want to get up and go!  In disharmony, we resist the changes and encounter difficulties.  During the Spring this can […]