12:00 12:00

Mexican Cocoa

By |2018-09-14T12:00:39+00:00September 14th, 2018|Categories: Blogs|Comments Off on Mexican Cocoa

Mexican Cocoa – – unsweetened cocoa powder, cinnamon, cayenne, chili powder, milk of choice (almond, soy or other nut milk. You can also substitute for Irish Creme or a coffee-liqueur), maple syrup, agave or honey (optional–you may not need a sweetener if you milk is sweet), Silver tequila (optional), paprika, cinnamon stick, , Prep the spices: In a saucepan over low heat add the cocoa powder, cinnamon, cayenne and chili. Toast until fragrant about 2 minutes–be careful to not burn the spices and cocoa.; Add the liquds: Slowly pour in milk, whisking gently, until fulling incorporated. Increase heat to medium and bring mixture to a low simmer. Blend in sweetener and remove from heat. ; Prep your mug: Rim a mug with paprika by first dipping the mug rim in a shallow saucer of water then into a saucer of paprika. Add tequila to mug and pour in hot cocoa mixture. Garnish with cinnamon stick and enjoy.; ; – – Blogs

12:04 12:04

Wild Products!

By |2018-08-16T12:26:24+00:00August 16th, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Herb Spotlights|Comments Off on Wild Products!

Now carrying Wild Foods products at Pulse! 

Chocolate Powder & Cocoa Nibs

  • Raw & unprocessed from organically grown cocoa beans.
  • Full of Antioxidants, Flavonoids (more than green tea, blueberries and red wine) Fiber, Protein, Vitamins and Minerals, Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, Calcium, Copper, Potassium, Chromium and Phosphorus.

Great for baking, hot chocolate, smoothies, coffee…you name it!

Lions Mane

  • “Raw superfood mushroom extracts help protect DNA oxidation while promoting overall well-being and mood. Use to support health, increase concentration, reduce anxiety and increase overall feelings of happiness.”
  • Considered a nootropic as it increases the amount of nerve growth function in the brain.
  • Antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Supports immune system.

Sip Wild Shrooms hot—like hot chocolate—or blend it with butter coffee brews and protein shakes or smoothies. You can also put in capsules!

Power Shroom Blend

  • Mushroom Blend Of Reishi, Chaga And Cordyceps.
  • Builds overall immune system.
  • Tonifies Lungs, Kidneys, & Spleen.

Mix 1/2 TSP in warm water, tea, coffee, smoothies or shakes. You can also use this powder to make your own capsules. 

12:52 12:52

Bitter – The Flavor of The Fire Element

By |2018-07-24T12:24:32+00:00July 21st, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Bitter – The Flavor of The Fire Element

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CN

Whoever coined the phrase “bitter hearts” was right.  Bitter is the flavor that goes directly to the Heart.   Bitter. Even its name can make us cringe, and it’s certainly not the most popular of the 5 Flavors (sweet, sour, pungent, and salty) yet it serves a vital role in our health.   The flavor is a powerful mover and enters the Heart, Small Intestines, Triple Warmer and Pericardium–all the Fire organs.  When the Fire element is in-balance we are joyful and can act on life plans, we make meaningful relationships and set appropriate boundaries–engage!

Still frowning?  You don’t need a lot of bitter, so just play along for a bit.

Bitter flavors enter the Heart and other Fire Organs

Each of the 5 Elements has numerous correspondences including flavor, season, color, organs, sound and emotion.  Fire and the bitter flavor correspond with the season of Summer, which is unique in that it has four organ systems rather than two like the other elements.  The Heart (Yin), Small Intestines (Yang), Pericardium (Yin) and Triple Warmer (Yang) all belong to the Fire element-and they have a lot going on.  The Heart, as the emperor, sits on his throne and controls the circulation of blood and allows us our most intimate relationships. Heart needs to express its truest self to the world. Small Intestines constantly sorts the ‘pure from the impure’–what to digest and what not to digest–physically, emotionally and spiritually–who do we keep in our lives, who do we need to let go of? A lot of people can get stuck in the process of sorting.  Pericardium has similar properties to the Heart and the Triple Warmer […]

16:48 16:48

Merry Mints–The Healing Energetics of Mint

By |2018-06-11T12:26:58+00:00June 10th, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , |Comments Off on Merry Mints–The Healing Energetics of Mint

Basil, apple, sage and spearmint;

Oregano, catnip, pineapple and peppermint;

To many dishes their flavor they’ve lent;

Yet why is one not called merriment?

Grandma June grew a peppermint bush around the water spigot off her front deck.  Content in its moist, rich soil and shaded in the afternoon, the plant grew to be a monster.  There was no way to reach in and turn on the hose without stirring up the mint’s refreshing fragrance or the bees if the plant was in bloom.  Each year she harvested the mint to make teas or jelly to serve with lamb or give as gifts.

In a burst of sentimentality, I planted a clump of mint next the water tap outside my back door.  It’s an easy grab to add fresh mint to salads and soups or to make refreshing teas, hair rinses and other delights.  And there’s an added bonus–ants hate peppermint.  So if you have a few pests in the spring consider a planting of mint, especially spearmint, lavender and penny royal along your home.

A little mint history

The aromatic presence of the mint family have be pleasing our senses for centuries.  Mints (mentha) are a part of the lamiaceae or labiatae family–which isn’t a small family.    It includes many of our favorite culinary herbs like basil, rosemary, oregano, sage and penny royal.   Honestly, there is a bit of debate in the horticulture world as to what clearly defines the mint family, but most recognize that there at least 25 species of mints and countless hybrids including the fun stuff like pineapple, ginger and chocolate mint.

We can track mint’s usage all the way back to Pliny the Elder in the […]

14:00 14:00

Sunomono (Cucumber Salad With Seaweed And Sesame)

By |2018-06-08T13:00:42+00:00June 8th, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Recipes, Sides and Salads, Summer Recipes, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Sunomono (Cucumber Salad With Seaweed And Sesame)

Cucumbers are perfect for handling summer’s heat.  Sunomono is a classic Japanese summer salad of cucumbers in vinegar with numerous variation.

Enjoy!

AprilSunomono (Cucumber Salad With Seaweed And Sesame) – – cucumber (cut in to 1/2 inch quarters), rice wine vinegar, nori or light seaweed (crumbled), sesame seed (black or brown), water, sugar (if needed), , Slice and quarter the cucumber to desired bit sizes.
In a medium bowl, combine vinegar, water, seaweed, seeds and sugar. Pour over cucumbers until thoroughly coated. Serve chilled.; ; – – salad – side – Asian – Blogs – Recipes – Sides and Salads – Summer Recipes – Vegan – Vegetables – Vegetarian – cucumber salad – cucumbers – Pulse Holistic Health – sunomon

10:44 10:44

Middle Eastern Lemonade

By |2018-06-08T12:58:48+00:00June 6th, 2018|Categories: Beverages, Blogs|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Middle Eastern Lemonade

The special ingredient in this refreshing drink is orange flower water (sometimes called orange blossom water). This distilled essence of orange blossom can be purchased in most well-stocked specialty grocery stores. Most orange blossom water comes from the south of France and from the Levant.

For an adult twist, serve with vodka or gin.

[…]

08:15 08:15

13 Tips to Simplify Your Meals

By |2018-05-21T12:38:35+00:00May 20th, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , |Comments Off on 13 Tips to Simplify Your Meals

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

“What’s for dinner?”

It’s a common question that can turn into an amusing (or annoying) game.  When you have a busy schedule it can be a daunting task to figure out how to eat well–let alone eat.  I’ll tell you a little secret–it’s all about habits.

Our culture has put emphasis on economy and convenience, at the cost of  our connection to self nourishment, and I’m not talking about restorative yoga.   Think about it.  We spend less time planning and preparing meals than any other culture in the world, and we have increasing disease and health costs that are directly related to dietary habits.  Diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, GERD (okay, there is a virus involved sometimes here, but I assure you, if you slow down how you eat, it improves considerably), kidney stones, ulcers, gout, heart disease–you get the picture.  We all know nutrition is important, what and how we eat is the basis for our energy, ability to health and overall health.

Wonderful.  So how do we start improving how we nourish ourselves?

Simple-create new habits that make better nourishment and eating habits a priority.

You will be hungry today, so why let that surprise you?  Why not plan for it instead? Your health and soul will thank you.   Let’s play with a few ideas.

1. Create time–If your current habits don’t allow you the time to menu plan, shop, prep and cook–budget some time.  Put it in your day planner or on your ‘to do’ list.  If you skip meals, put the time for them in your planner as well.  It usually takes me about 15 minutes to make a menu for the week and […]

12:41 12:41

Cabin Fever Herbs

By |2018-05-21T12:40:17+00:00May 14th, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Herb Spotlights, Herbs & Spices|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Cabin Fever Herbs

Cabin Fever. Climbing the Walls. Temporary Insanity. Common terms that imply agitation, anxiety, restlessness, and a general sense of unsettledness. These symptoms are often experienced in the spring by people who tend to run towards yin deficiency from a Chinese Medicine perspective. Much to my surprise Spring Fever means the opposite of these symptoms and is instead associated with lassitude, apathy, and half heartedness, something I will cover in another article.

The following three formulas all have a sedating affect on the central nervous system but through different mechanisms.

A quick note: with any supplement always consult with a qualified practitioner before taking as undesirable side effects may occur when taken by someone who does not need it.

Lavender – Integrative Therapeutics Lavela WS 1265


Lavender has been cultivated and used for thousands of years as a calming and cleansing herb. Experiential evidence has shown that the fragrance of the flowers soothes the mind and extracts of the flowers and plants can be used to effective clean and purify surfaces and living spaces. A simple search of the web will reveal the myriad of uses that lavender has been put to throughout time, anything from placing satchels of flowers in clothing drawers to deter moths and other insects to placing it in pillows to help calm a person to sleep.

Modern science in seeking to understand why lavender has endured in usage through the ages have studied its actions in the brain and its effect on our body. Study results have shown that in the brain, lavender has effects similar to Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) and Gabapentin, both of which help to regulate the nervous system and provide a sense […]

06:34 06:34

Sprouts, A Deeper Look

By |2018-05-31T13:42:38+00:00May 2nd, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Sprouts, A Deeper Look

by Nathan Mandigo

A while ago I wrote on an article on the basics of sprouting (find it here) which mentioned just a few of the wonderful benefits that can be gained from sprouts.  Today I would like to take a deeper look at the benefits of sprouts and their amazing properties.

From a Western perspective, sprouts are very nutritious as they are a good source of many vitamins and trace minerals that many people in this country are deficient in, they have a low glycemic response, and are a good source of dietary fiber.  What makes sprouts most interesting from my perspective is the presence of a chemical called coumarin.

Coumarin is a naturally occurring, fragrant chemical present in most feed plants and several other common foods (like cinnamon (cassia sourced), strawberries and cherries).  A feed plant is any plant that is used to feed livestock or which graze lands are planted with, such as alfalfa or clover, two very common sprout seeds.  In concentrated forms, coumarin is toxic to the body and is one of the precursors used to make rat poison and blood thinners, that’s not the interesting part.  The interesting part is that coumarin in small quantities, as found in sprouts, increases our sensation of satiation.  It makes us feel fuller faster by making the body think we have eaten more than we have so we are less inclined to overeat.  Scientist believe this property in these plants was evolved as a way to stave off over feeding by grazing animals to give plants a chance to seed.  If you would like read more about coumarin, here is the wikipedia article.

From a Chinese medicine perspective, sprouts, are also an […]

13:06 13:06

Cherries! Nature’s Blood Cleanser

By |2018-05-21T13:11:13+00:00April 22nd, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Cherries! Nature’s Blood Cleanser

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

It’s time for cherries!  If you’ve ever picked cherries, likely you have an appreciation for how much labor goes into caring for and harvesting the delicate, tart orbs that are available fresh for only a few weeks. Depending on the variety, a single cherry tree can produce about 30 lbs of fruit each year.   A single acre of land can be planted with several hundred trees. That’s a lot of little fruit, and although there are mechanical harvesters, most cherries are still picked by hand making them one of the most labor intensive fruits with the one of the shortest harvest season. But they are well worth it.

A little cherry history

Cherries are a drupe, meaning they have a pit in their center. Like other drupes, including apricots, nectarines, and peaches, they are a member of the rose family and are native to the western hemisphere of Europe and Asia. Written records of cherry farming date back to 72 BC Anatolia (modern day Turkey) and they found their way to America with the pilgrims.   Today, only about 15 of some 500 plus varieties are grown for the American consumer.  However, heirloom varieties are on the rise thanks to the natural food movements throughout the world and our nation.

Western nutritional highlights of cherries

Cherries range from a deep black/red to a golden yellow, and they are categorized as sweet or sour, even in western nutritional terms.  Raw cherries provide dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamin A and minerals. Don’t look to cherries if you are seeking proteins, fats and or complex carbohydrates. That’s not their job–cherries clear and cleanse.

The healing energetics […]