09:45 09:45

Playing With Pumpkins & Winter Squash

By | 2018-05-31T13:38:27+00:00 September 28th, 2015|Categories: Autumn, Blogs, Late Summer/Transition, Nutrition Articles, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on Playing With Pumpkins & Winter Squash

April Crowell, Dipl.ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

“Squash would be great for you to eat.”

It’s a common recommendation that I make.  And for good reason. Pumpkins and winter squash are the perfect food for strengthening your Spleen, Stomach and the core of your body.  But we are getting ahead of ourselves.

A Little History

Native to North America, we’ve been playing with pumpkins and winter squash for nearly 7,000 years.  The word pumpkin was actually first used by American colonists.  It’s a bit of a word play from British term ‘pumpion’ which originated from the Greek word “pepon” meaning “large melon,”  a term the Greeks applied to large round objects.

Pumpkins, squash and gourds are members of the enormously diverse Cucurbitaceae family, which contains more than 100 genera and over 700 species.  They have been providing mankind with food and utilitarian objects since before recorded history.  Names differ throughout the world, but in the United States, any round, orange squash used for pies or jack-o-lanterns is likely to be called a pumpkin.  But the term “pumpkin” really has no botanical meaning, as they are actually all squash.  Squash are divided into two categories: tender or summer squash, and hard-skinned or winter squash.  Examples of summer squash include zucchini, pattypan, straightneck, and crookneck squash.  Winter squash include small to medium hard-skinned squash such as the acorn, small hubbard, miniature pumpkin and spaghetti types, as well as the large hard-skinned types, including banana, butternuts, cheese pumpkins, cushaws, and large hubbards, among others.

During the late 1800’s pumpkins and squash were viewed as by the aristocracy as “poor people’s food.”  Something less than favorable for those who could afford to dine regularly on meats and rich foods.  Even today, squashes and […]

06:06 06:06

Warm Squash And Proscuito Salad

By | 2016-07-07T13:16:07+00:00 September 4th, 2014|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Recipes, Sides and Salads, Vegetables|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on Warm Squash And Proscuito Salad

April Crowell Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Best served while the squash is still warm, this salad is a lovely mix of all 5 flavors and delightful with the first hard squashes during late summer or autumn. I chose to cook the prosciutto to add a little extra warmth and crunch.Warm Squash And Proscuito Salad – – delicata squash (seeded and roasted (see below)), proscuito (fresh or crispened), mixed seasonal greens (I used spinach, arugula and baby kale), Parmesan cheese (grated or shaved), Herb balsamic dressing, Herb Balsamic Dressing: white balsamic, honey, extra virgin olive oil, dried Italian herbs (I used a mix of oregano, rosemary and thyme), salt and pepper to taste, Roast squash: Preheat oven to 400. Slice delicata squash into 1/2 inch wide strips. Seed and lightly coat squash with olive oil. Roast until squash is soft, about 30 minutes or until a fork inserted pulls out easily. Allow to cool slightly so you can handle it. Peel away squash from its skin. ; Cook prosciutto, if desired: While the squash cooks, cook prosciutto in a skillet over medium heat, until crisp. Be careful to not over cook, as it can burn easily. Remove from heat, drain on paper towels if necessary. ; Combine the salad: Clean and blot or spin dry greens, if necessary. Lightly toss the greens with balsamic dressing until just coated. Place greens on individual plates, layered with 2-3 slices of squash. Crumble on prosciutto. Top with shavings of Parmesan.; Make the dressing: Simply combine all ingredients in a bowl or dressing jar and thoroughly combine. Adjust seasonings. I like mine a little ‘herbier’ […]

14:05 14:05

Autumn Vegetable Stew

By | 2016-12-29T12:24:19+00:00 September 2nd, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Gluten Free, Soups and Stew, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on Autumn Vegetable Stew

Butter nut squash or sweet potato?  Which to use?  With this recipe, either is fine.  It some times comes down to what I have on hand and need to use. This soup is delightfully warm, colorful and flavorful–perfect for a crisp day. If you want the soup richer, use organic beef broth instead of chicken or vegetable broth. If you like things a little spicier, add in a little hot pepper.   Serve with warm corn bread or over your favorite hot grain like rice, barley or quinoa.Autumn Vegetable Stew – – large onion (diced), green pepper (chopped), red pepper (chopped), butternut squash (or 2 medium sweet potatoes) (peeled, seeded and cut into 1/2 inch chunks), chicken or vegetable broth, fresh corn (if using frozen, thaw first), carrots (peeled and chopped), butter or olive oil, salt and pepper to taste, In large pot, melt butter or heat oil.
Sauté onions and peppers until just tender.
Add in broth, squash, corn and carrots.
Cook until squash is soft, about 45 minutes.
Adjust the seasonings to your tastes.
Serve with scoop of cooked whole grain like rice or barley or with hot corn bread.; –