08:44 08:44

Digestion And A Happy Gut-Food As Medicine

By | 2018-05-31T13:42:06+00:00 August 30th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Digestion And A Happy Gut-Food As Medicine

Carla Kyle, Dipl ABT, NCCAOM  Senior Healing Qigong Instructor

A friend of mine for some mysterious reason found that every winter her daily poop quota fell short, most particularly on the weekends. She eventually discovered that nixing her energy bars on the weekend, she could get the job done! Such a simple thing, yet one that caused severe discomfort year after year. Most energy bars contain a combination of dried fruits, dry oatmeal, dry chia seeds, dry roasted nuts all baked together – you get the picture? Desert dry Internal conditions can come from the foods we eat.

Fortunately for those of us seeking tummy and gut comfort after months or years of system malfunction, we can return to Food as Medicine. This is the idea that you can begin to add in more helpful foods and let go of the less helpful foods that are plaguing your tummy and plugging, or, overflowing your pipes.

The following information is a picture of what a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioner looks at when considering a course of food therapy for YOU, You may be doing A LOT of these things already. Don’t be discouraged! This is where the system of TCM food therapy shows its worth. TCM providers look at your tongue and read your pulses to discern where YOUR underlying disharmony is coming from. You may be surprised to find out how a few small changes can make a huge difference!

What takes place during a Traditional Chinese Medicine visit?

  • The nature of what you eat is discussed during your visit.
  • Your tongue is looked at and read, your pulse is read in the 3 positions and 3 levels
  • Your elemental nature becomes apparent with talk, channel palpation, acupressure […]
09:15 09:15

The Nutrient Qi Cycle

By | 2018-05-25T12:19:56+00:00 August 19th, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on The Nutrient Qi Cycle

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Ever wonder why some physical complaints seem to pop up at a certain time?

Understanding the Nutrient Qi Cycle or Cycle of Tides might be helpful.

Qi (pronounced “chee”), a key concept in Chinese medicine, is as immaterial as a thought or as dense as a table. Ever changing, Qi moves from material to immaterial and vice versa, sometimes very quickly and sometimes very slowly.  When looking at the body, there are many flows of Qi, and we identify and name each based on what it is currently doing–its function rather than its structure.

The Nutrient Qi cycle is just one of the main flows of qi in the body.  This rhythmic flow circulates Qi, Blood and Fluids  in an orderly 2 hour sequence from one organ channel to the next throughout the entire day.  Understanding this flow can be helpful in creating greater wellness and  in identifying disharmonies that  seems to happen at a particular time. Whether you wake up every morning at 3 am, or feel tired at 2 pm in the afternoon can be an indicator of an imbalance in this flow.

In the Nutrient Qi cycle is the energetic flow that occurs along the 12 primary channels or meridians in a constant ebb and flow.  The cycle begins at 3 am starting in the Lung channel flowing as follows:

Lungs: 3-5am– Wonderful time to get up and breathe or meditate (5ish). It is not uncommon for people with Liver and Lung issues to pop awake at 3am, simply because the Qi is having difficulties jumping from Liver 14, below the nipple line on the chest to Lung 1 below the clavicle. Coughing may be worse at this time for those with allergies and asthma.

Large […]

14:35 14:35

Understanding The Season of Late Summer

By | 2018-05-31T13:35:43+00:00 September 3rd, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Holistic Living, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Understanding The Season of Late Summer

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

The days are growing shorter, the air has a crisp bite, the kids are back in school and the first leaves are starting to change.  It’s not Summer anymore, yet it’s not really Fall either.  We are drifting from Summer into Late Summer.  Most of us have heard of  Indian or Late Summer,  there is a sudden warming glow again before Autumn takes hold.  In Chinese medicine this is a special season all its own.  In truth, the season encompasses four particular times of year, not just Late Summer.  Late Summer or ‘Dojo’, as it is called by the Japanese, is the buffer between each of the four main seasons. It is a time of balance, a buffering from shifting from one season to the next corresponding to the week before and after each equinox and the solstice.  This time of year is all about centering and it provides us some excellent opportunities to nourish our bodies, especially the digestive system.   […]