13:06 13:06

Cherries! Nature’s Blood Cleanser

By |2018-05-21T13:11:13+00:00April 22nd, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Cherries! Nature’s Blood Cleanser

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

It’s time for cherries!  If you’ve ever picked cherries, likely you have an appreciation for how much labor goes into caring for and harvesting the delicate, tart orbs that are available fresh for only a few weeks. Depending on the variety, a single cherry tree can produce about 30 lbs of fruit each year.   A single acre of land can be planted with several hundred trees. That’s a lot of little fruit, and although there are mechanical harvesters, most cherries are still picked by hand making them one of the most labor intensive fruits with the one of the shortest harvest season. But they are well worth it.

A little cherry history

Cherries are a drupe, meaning they have a pit in their center. Like other drupes, including apricots, nectarines, and peaches, they are a member of the rose family and are native to the western hemisphere of Europe and Asia. Written records of cherry farming date back to 72 BC Anatolia (modern day Turkey) and they found their way to America with the pilgrims.   Today, only about 15 of some 500 plus varieties are grown for the American consumer.  However, heirloom varieties are on the rise thanks to the natural food movements throughout the world and our nation.

Western nutritional highlights of cherries

Cherries range from a deep black/red to a golden yellow, and they are categorized as sweet or sour, even in western nutritional terms.  Raw cherries provide dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamin A and minerals. Don’t look to cherries if you are seeking proteins, fats and or complex carbohydrates. That’s not their job–cherries clear and cleanse.

The healing energetics […]

09:00 09:00

Spring’s Energetics–The Season Of The Wood Element

By |2018-05-31T13:42:07+00:00March 6th, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Spring, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Welcome to Spring!

When does Spring really begin? For most Western cultures, we correlate the start of Spring with the Spring equinox, around March 20-21st.  But all of us know that Spring has been well underway by the time the equinox pops up. If you look at the seasonal correspondences in Chinese medicine’s Yin/Yang theory, the Winter solstice marks the depth of Winter, yet as soon as we reach maximum Yin (the shortest day of the year), Yang and light start to return–literally, Spring is on its way.  A quick look at the lunar calendar can also help us understand why Spring seems to come early or late from one year to the next.  The Chinese New Year heralds the start of the Spring festivals and planting seasons.  This holiday falls on the second new moon after the Winter solstice, sometime between the end of January and the middle of February.

Our bodies feel seasonal changes, and when we are in harmony with these shifts we can delight in the blessings of the season.  However, the transition from Winter to Spring is perhaps, the most tumultuous transition. It’s a duel between the quiet and restive inward energy of Winter into the strong, upward ascending of Yang energy–and its energy can be big.  The season of the Wood element, Spring is a time of tremendous energy, and excitement in the world and in our bodies.   It’s a time of change and growth.  Our bodies want to move more, we have more energy within us and we want to get up and go!  In disharmony, we resist the changes and encounter difficulties.  During the Spring this can […]

11:42 11:42

Mini Clafoutis

By |2017-03-17T14:36:42+00:00March 17th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Dairy Free, Desserts & Sweets, Diabetes Friendly, Eggs, Fruit, Gluten Free, Recipes, Vegetable|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Clafoutis, a dish popularized in America by Julia Child, are easy to make and endless in variety (see notes).  Just think of them as mini quiches without the crust.  These clafoutis make lovely items for spring brunches as they can be eaten hot or at room temperature.  They are also great little after-school nibble or to pack for a picnic.

Enjoy!  April

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12:12 12:12

Loving Chocolate–Understanding The Energetics of Chocolate

By |2018-06-01T11:02:46+00:00January 9th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CHN

Who doesn’t love a little chocolate?

Theobroma Cacao is a much loved and very powerful food living up to its ancient name as the food of the gods.    On the average, we Americans each indulge in about 12 pounds of the dark treat yearly.  That stretches out about 100 pounds of chocolate being consumed a second–whew–and that’s just Americans who rank 4th in consumption of chocolate worldwide.  Not surprisingly, the Swiss rank first in the world for individual consumption of chocolate.

The history of chocolate–in five paragraphs

Use of the cacao tree dates back at least 5,000 years to Brazil and the Amazon. Images of the cacao pods have been carved into Mayan stone temples dating back to as early as 300 C.E.  A symbol of fertility, vitality and life, the Mayans revered and used cacao extensively.  By 600 C.E. the Mayans had expanded and were cultivating crops of cacao from the Yucatan Peninsula to the Pacific Coast.

The Mayans mixed cocoa with peppers, cornmeal and other foods to create a strong drink that was used for religious ceremonies and a wide variety of medicinal purposes. This wasn’t the sweet confection we are so familiar with now, rather this was a very bitter and thick “bitter water” or xocoatl–which we derived the word chocolate from. The Mayans brewed xocoatl to treat everything from an upset stomach, low energy and libido, to lowering fevers, expectorating phlegm, treating blood in the stools and diarrhea. It was also used to regulate sleep–by either encouraging it or prohibiting–a dynamic little trait of chocolate. Woman used it treat patterns of deficiency including […]

08:22 08:22

Pulse’s First Tuesday Talks

By |2018-05-31T13:38:45+00:00September 30th, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Holistic Living, Specials|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

FIRST TUESDAY TALKS

Join our FREE talks 12:15-1pm every first Tuesday of the month.  

Bring your snack or lunch and find out what we have to offer.

Here’s what’s coming up!

December 1st–A Warm Winter

Arthritis? Winter aches and pains?  This talk will be devoted to looking at some common patterns of aches and pains that become worse in the cold, windy and damp weather, how you identify your patterns nature and what simple remedies you can use to ease up the aches and pains of winter.  April Crowell

January 5th–A Joyous January

Some people love the New Year, other may find themselves battling off guilt and depression.  Using 5 Element and other Chinese Medicine theories we will look at the nature and energetics around the beginning of the New Year.  We will look at ways that you can recognize your possible patterns of disharmony and how you identify and embrace the blessings the season has to offer. –April Crowell

February 3rd–TBA

Let us know if you plan on joining–so we make sure to have enough handouts available!

Talks are held at Pulse Holistic Health

725 N. 15th, Boise, Id 83702  208.955.8272

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09:15 09:15

The Nutrient Qi Cycle

By |2018-05-25T12:19:56+00:00August 19th, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on The Nutrient Qi Cycle

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Ever wonder why some physical complaints seem to pop up at a certain time?

Understanding the Nutrient Qi Cycle or Cycle of Tides might be helpful.

Qi (pronounced “chee”), a key concept in Chinese medicine, is as immaterial as a thought or as dense as a table. Ever changing, Qi moves from material to immaterial and vice versa, sometimes very quickly and sometimes very slowly.  When looking at the body, there are many flows of Qi, and we identify and name each based on what it is currently doing–its function rather than its structure.

The Nutrient Qi cycle is just one of the main flows of qi in the body.  This rhythmic flow circulates Qi, Blood and Fluids  in an orderly 2 hour sequence from one organ channel to the next throughout the entire day.  Understanding this flow can be helpful in creating greater wellness and  in identifying disharmonies that  seems to happen at a particular time. Whether you wake up every morning at 3 am, or feel tired at 2 pm in the afternoon can be an indicator of an imbalance in this flow.

In the Nutrient Qi cycle is the energetic flow that occurs along the 12 primary channels or meridians in a constant ebb and flow.  The cycle begins at 3 am starting in the Lung channel flowing as follows:

Lungs: 3-5am– Wonderful time to get up and breathe or meditate (5ish). It is not uncommon for people with Liver and Lung issues to pop awake at 3am, simply because the Qi is having difficulties jumping from Liver 14, below the nipple line on the chest to Lung 1 below the clavicle. Coughing may be worse at this time for those with allergies and asthma.

Large […]

10:00 10:00

Peas, Please! A New Look At An Old Food

By |2018-05-31T13:35:51+00:00April 18th, 2015|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Peas–it seems that people either love them or hate them.  Personally, I love them, and there is really nothing like the taste of peas plucked straight off the vine.  Their sweetness comes from the natural sugars that begin to break down into starches the moment you pick them.   We treasure them in the spring as one of our early crops but with a little planning, you can harvest them in most regions from late spring up to the first frost.

Vegetable or legume?

Both–peas are eaten both dried and fresh (green).  Native to India, there are more than 50 varieties of peas and much of the world eats peas in both their dry and fresh form, especially the Middle East and Asia.  Americans, however, tend to favor fresh peas.  Peas’ nutrition and energetics will change a little depending on whether you eat them dry or fresh, but these little legumes make an wonderful addition to any diet.

Western nutritional take on peas

Peas are an excellent source of protein, vitamins A and B and minerals including calcium, sulfur, potassium and iron.  Dried peas are a great source of fiber.  Green peas (fresh or frozen) have vitamin C, K and carotenes, that are lost in the dried form.  Like other legumes and lentils, peas lower cholesterol, especially in their dried form where they are most able to absorb excess and dampness (one of the ways Chinese medicine categorizes cholesterol).

Eastern energetics of peas

Peas have neutral temperature and very sweet flavor.  They enter the Spleen/pancreas, and relax the Stomach and Heart.  Peas help to calm down the Liver when it is overly hot or toxic–which is often for many Americans, especially in the […]

14:35 14:35

Understanding The Season of Late Summer

By |2018-05-31T13:35:43+00:00September 3rd, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Holistic Living, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

The days are growing shorter, the air has a crisp bite, the kids are back in school and the first leaves are starting to change.  It’s not Summer anymore, yet it’s not really Fall either.  We are drifting from Summer into Late Summer.  Most of us have heard of  Indian or Late Summer,  there is a sudden warming glow again before Autumn takes hold.  In Chinese medicine this is a special season all its own.  In truth, the season encompasses four particular times of year, not just Late Summer.  Late Summer or ‘Dojo’, as it is called by the Japanese, is the buffer between each of the four main seasons. It is a time of balance, a buffering from shifting from one season to the next corresponding to the week before and after each equinox and the solstice.  This time of year is all about centering and it provides us some excellent opportunities to nourish our bodies, especially the digestive system.   […]

11:23 11:23

Tomatoes–A Fruit Dressed Up As A Vegetable

By |2018-05-31T13:33:28+00:00August 4th, 2014|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Nutrition Articles, Summer, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

It’s very hot this year, which means tomatoes will soon be running amok in my garden and kitchen.  Which sounds funny if you know me–I don’t love tomatoes and will pluck them off my plate–unless they are fresh or the sauce comes from tomatoes that I know ripened here and now. It’s a first world burden that comes from having a large garden with fresh tomatoes since I was little.  I love growing the colorful little gems in my garden, and their flavor is truly different fresh off the plant.

Fruit or vegetable?

Fruit. Tomatoes have of habit of hanging out in both the vegetable and fruit category in stores, garden centers and cookbooks, but to be botanically correct–they are a fruit.  Yes, just take a look at those slippery seed clusters that reveal their true identity.  Like other fruits, they develop from the ovaries of flowers.  However, they are most often listed in the vegetable category as they don’t share the sweetness and high sugar content of other fruits.

A little tomato history

Native to South America and Central America, the Aztecs had been eating tomatls for centuries, long before the Spaniards showed up in Central America.  History tends to credit Cortez with the discovery of tomatoes in 1519 when he found them growing in Montezuma’s gardens.  He returned to Europe triumphantly with his new seeds.  The first tomatoes to arrive in Europe were likely small and yellow in color, as the Italians and Spanish refer to them as pomi d’oro (yellow apples).   However, the Europeans were skeptical of the shiny new food, assuming them poisonous, and planted the tomatoes as ornamentals.   The French botanists, Tournefort, would […]