07:54 07:54

Rent Space At Pulse!

By |2018-04-18T09:54:48+00:00April 18th, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Community Announcements & Events|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Rent Space At Pulse!

Rent Our Space!

Bright, clean and peaceful office space for a healing professional. Ideal for life coaches, counselor, therapists, ND, one on one yoga or other healthcare professionals. Ideal for established practitioners.  Fabulous downtown location in Boise’s Historic North End with quick access to downtown and the connector. Space features fully furnished room, reception area, large meeting space and kitchen space.

About Pulse

Boise’s longest running holistic health care practice, Pulse is a group of independent Holistic healthcare practitioners offering a variety of modalities and skills.  Our vision is to help you and your family maintain or improve on your health and wellbeing at any age or stage of life. In illness, Holistic healthcare modalities focus on  maximizing the body’s own natural ability to heal by treating the root of the condition to alleviate symptoms and provide long-term freedom from illness.

Call for more details or for a tour. 208.955.8272

Rent by hour or by day.

$18- by hour
$200 – 1 day week
$325 – 2 days week
$410 – 3 days week
$450 – 4 days week

Includes:

Fabulous downtown location
WiFi & Utilities
Website & Online presence
Furnished room with linens
Handicap access
Reception & conference space
Kitchen space

11:45 11:45

Simple Steps for Dealing with Allergies

By |2018-04-09T10:09:25+00:00April 8th, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Red, itchy eyes, sore throat, sinus congestion, running nose, puffy face, congested ears, swollen lips, headaches. Although it may be true that certain seasons have a propensity to bombard us with excess pollen, or air particulates from farming, and pollution there isn’t really one season for allergies. Some people only suffer during a spring and/or autumn season while others may suffer all year long. Some people are allergic to only one thing, while others suffer from a multitude or combination of allergens. Whatever the individual pattern, it is estimated that nearly 50 million Americans suffer from allergies. It’s estimated that over-the-counter sales of allergies medicines should reach $14.7 billion dollars in 2015–that’s a lot of sneezing and muzzy headedness.

I used to believe that seasonal allergies were coming earlier every year.  Though this may be partly true, what I now see in my practice is that Boise’s air quality is declining enough that clients are suffering more and often longer with allergies–crud.

Allergies in the eyes of western medicine

Allergic rhinitis, or hay fever, is an example of compromised immunity. Basically, the immune system has a hyper response to a strong pathogen (pollen, an abundance of cat dander, etc) and this causes a rapid physiological changes resulting in itchy eyes and throat, sinus congestion, sneezing, asthma and even diarrhea.  Exposure to an allergen would cause a massive release of IgE antibodies which attach to white blood cells known as mast cells. These cells are mostly located in the lungs and upper respiratory tract, the lining of the stomach and the skin. When these cells are stimulated, they release a number of chemicals including histamine which produce the allergic symptoms.
An […]

09:00 09:00

Spring’s Energetics–The Season Of The Wood Element

By |2018-05-31T13:42:07+00:00March 6th, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Spring, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Welcome to Spring!

When does Spring really begin? For most Western cultures, we correlate the start of Spring with the Spring equinox, around March 20-21st.  But all of us know that Spring has been well underway by the time the equinox pops up. If you look at the seasonal correspondences in Chinese medicine’s Yin/Yang theory, the Winter solstice marks the depth of Winter, yet as soon as we reach maximum Yin (the shortest day of the year), Yang and light start to return–literally, Spring is on its way.  A quick look at the lunar calendar can also help us understand why Spring seems to come early or late from one year to the next.  The Chinese New Year heralds the start of the Spring festivals and planting seasons.  This holiday falls on the second new moon after the Winter solstice, sometime between the end of January and the middle of February.

Our bodies feel seasonal changes, and when we are in harmony with these shifts we can delight in the blessings of the season.  However, the transition from Winter to Spring is perhaps, the most tumultuous transition. It’s a duel between the quiet and restive inward energy of Winter into the strong, upward ascending of Yang energy–and its energy can be big.  The season of the Wood element, Spring is a time of tremendous energy, and excitement in the world and in our bodies.   It’s a time of change and growth.  Our bodies want to move more, we have more energy within us and we want to get up and go!  In disharmony, we resist the changes and encounter difficulties.  During the Spring this can […]

09:33 09:33

Elderberry Syrup and Tea for Colds and Flu

By |2018-05-21T11:56:24+00:00October 27th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Elderberry Syrup and Tea for Colds and Flu

As Autumn creeps in I stock my cupboards with a few items to prevent and treat colds and flu. Gan Mao Ling, Kwan Loong oil, vitamin C, Immustim or Wellness Formula, to name a few, but one of my favorites is simple and reliable elderberry tea and syrup.

All parts of the elder plant have a long history in folk medicine. The flower is used to promote sweating and resolve phlegm from exterior pathogens. The inner bark and root are used as strong emetics and to relieve stubborn constipation. The leaves and berries can be made into poultices with vinegar or honey to relieve damp heat in the skin such as poison ivy.

Elderberry syrup is one of the first things that I reach for when someone is starting to fight a cold or flu. From a Chinese medicine perspective there are two major reasons that we get sick: either our system is weak and susceptible to exterior invasion (Lung qi and wei qi deficiency) or the pathogen is exceptionally strong relative to us (think of plagues). Elderberry helps to strengthen any Lung deficiency condition, giving your immune system a powerful boost. It is antiviral and anti-infective, perfect for fighting off those pesky viruses. The berry also has expectorant, diaphoretic and diuretic properties to help move fluids, the bowels and relieve phlegm. It even helps treat food poisoning. Elderberry is high in calcium, vitamins A, C and B6 and iron—and, best of all, it’s tasty and kids don’t usually mind it.

So how do I use it?
I start to use elderberry tea (often mixed with other teas like berry or nettles) several times a week at the start of school or weather transitions. The syrup is handy for […]

13:10 13:10

12 Tips For Handling Heartburn And Indigestion

By |2017-09-22T08:56:06+00:00September 20th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Digestive disturbances affect nearly everyone at some point in their life and it’s estimated that 40% of Americans will suffer from heartburn at least once each month–ouch.  In fact, the proton pump inhibitor drugs (think Nexium and Prevacid) are the third largest class of drugs sold in America each year.    The following recommendations are beneficial for any level of digestive vibrancy, whether you have excellent digestion and want to make the most of a healthy system or you are treating chronic or debilitating digestive issues.  Honestly, I know of no condition that will not improve or benefit from the simple habits listed below.

Chew your food —Let’s start at the beginning.  Besides the teeth mechanically breaking down the food, salivary amylase is added in the mouth to break down starches.  This enzyme is not found in the stomach–it has to be added into the food in the mouth.  Although the stomach churns to help break food down, it doesn’t have teeth and large chunks of food overly burden the stomach causing gas, bloating, and acid re-flux.   The physical act of chew also triggers mass peristalsis in the colon–meaning you will move your bowels more regularly.  Ideally, you should chew your food about 30 times, so put your fork down between each bite and savor your food.

Have a seat–“Li proceeds Qi.” Literally, where your intention goes your Qi (energy & manifestation)  will follow.  If your intention is to eat a meal, assist your body by sitting down, relaxing and enjoying your food.  If your attention is rushed or focused elsewhere Qi won’t readily flow into your digestive organs to help properly transform the food. Voila–you now have […]

11:03 11:03

Windy Conditions

By |2018-05-31T13:42:04+00:00March 31st, 2016|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Spring|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT. NCCAOM CI & CP, CHN

It’s a blustery day!

Each of the 5 Seasons in Chinese medicine has a climatic nature that it corresponds to.  Summer relates to Heat, Autumn to Dryness, Winter to Cold, Late Summer  (the transition of seasons) relates to Dampness, and Spring corresponds to Wind. These climates are simply part of the  nature of the season, and people may be more vulnerable to these climatic conditions, and each can manifest as a series of patterns in the body.  What I pay attention to, as Chinese medicine practitioner and Amma Therapist, is how these may manifest in the body.  Ah…here comes the Wind.   Whipping through the tops of the trees, windy patterns may arise in our bodies as colds, allergies, ticks, stiff necks and more.  In Chinese medicine, Wind corresponds to Spring season and the Liver and Gall Bladder channel, and most Springs are windy.  But Wind can invade in any season, and Wind often picks up again in the Autumn.

Wind can be an exterior or interior pattern

Exterior pathogens (Wind, Hot, Cold, Dry, Damp, Summer Heat ) invade our bodies either because the pathogen is excessively strong compared to normal Wei Qi (immunity), think of plagues and virulent viruses–OR–the body is too week to fend off the invasion.   This is the pattern that appears in people who seem to get sick at the drop of a hat.

Interior patterns are generated by disharmonies within the body.  Eating too many hot foods can damage the Yin (cooling) of the body and lead to heat.  Although there may be a bit of overlap, the treatment focus of interior vs exterior will be different.  Read more on exterior and interior […]

13:35 13:35

The 8 Branches Of Chinese Medicine

By |2018-05-22T11:31:59+00:00March 7th, 2016|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, Herbs & Spices, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on The 8 Branches Of Chinese Medicine

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

The Eight Branches represent the areas of one’s life that should be taken into account for maintaining a holistic, preventative lifestyle. They are listed in an ideal hierarchy—literally, what should be practiced regularly to maintain health before moving into more invasive methods to moderate or regain well-being. Here’s a brief overview.

1–Meditation–By meditating we are able to connect with the deepest aspects of our being, and therefore be able to engage in our lives with greater purpose and direction.  It provides the opportunity for deep introspection, creates connection with life and greater space within ourselves. Truly, this is the first step in finding out who you are, why you are here and what you can do.  Regular meditation also has innumerable physical benefits such as lowering blood pressure and helping to manage emotions.

2–Exercise–Appropriate exercise is a key to maintaining body and mind health. Finding the correct exercise for the individual needs is a priority. A lack of exercise or over exercising is also detrimental to overall health. Yang (very active exercise) like vigorous martial arts, power yoga, marathon running and mountain biking, may be appropriate for a person with a strong constitution and physical strength. Yin (restorative and calming exercise) like restorative yoga, and gentle qi gong or t’ai qi are great for those needing to replenish, stretch, and deeply nourish. For the overall healthy individual you need a little a bit of both, but for someone recovering from serious illness, gentle yin activity is the start.

3–Nutrition and Tonic Herbs & Foods–How we nourish ourselves is a direct reflection of our state of conscious health. Choosing foods vibrant in Qi, that are mostly local, organic, sustainable and seasonally […]

09:07 09:07

Fire Cupping

By |2018-05-31T13:39:07+00:00February 17th, 2016|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions|Tags: , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Fire cupping is a wonderful therapy that has been a part of Chinese medicine for at least 3,000 years, and it’s becoming more common and familiar to Americans.  Thank you!  Though on first impression it may look a little daunting, fire cupping feels great and moves Qi magnificently.  However, it is not for everyone and considerations must be taken into account with each individual client.

 

April Crowell Fire Cupping

A little history on cupping

Before there was glass, horns or bamboo cups were used for fire cupping.  However,  they carried with them a few problems–namely sterilization, access to horns (not a wildlife friendly practice), and the ability to see how treatment was proceeding.  Glass jars proved far superior because they seal better to the flesh, are easy to clean and their clear structure allowed the practitioner to observe the progress of treatment better.  Today, some practitioners use plastic cups with a suctioning apparatus–but I simply favor the fire.

What is fire cupping?

Fire cupping uses glass jars that have an ignited material (I use cotton balls soaked in alcohol) placed briefly inside them to create negative pressure.  The flame is then quickly removed and the jar placed over specific areas of the body creating suction.  This pressure moves the Blood, Qi and fluids of the area raising a petechiae rash–that’s a good thing in this case.

Petechiae Rash

The rash itself is an assessment tool for the practitioner.  Its color, how quickly or slowly it rises and how long it remains reveal how deep the pattern of disharmony is.  For example a deep purple rash indicates […]

09:18 09:18

The Year Of The Fire Monkey

By |2016-12-29T12:24:14+00:00January 16th, 2016|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Community Announcements & Events|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Monday, February 8th, 2016 is the second new moon following the winter solstice.  This is the Chinese New Year and the start of the spring festival in Asian cultures. In February, the stubborn but gentle Wood Goat  steps aside to make room for the lively Fire (Red) Monkey.

Each year of the Chinese calendar corresponds to one of the 12 animals (rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, sheep, monkey, rooster, dog and the pig).  Besides the animal, we also cycle through each of the 5 elements (fire, earth, metal,water and wood) to create a full 60 year cycle.  By the time you cycle back to the animal year and element that you were born in you will be 60–so, don’t hold your breath.  Each animal carries its own unique personality and disposition, couple that with the elemental energies and can get an idea of the nature of the how the year may play out.

The nature of the monkey

Those born in the year of the monkey (2016, 2004, 1992….just keep subtracting 12…) are highly sociable, talkative and quick witted, imaginative and loyal.  They often have a large group of friends, are very inquisitive, and require constant activity and movement.  They are highly intelligent and competitive,  they love money and are often skilled at whatever career they choose. Monkeys get bored easily and are always on the go–looking for the next adventure or game.  Monkeys tend to have keen mental and psychological skills that allow them to read others easily.  In virtue, this enables the to understand others quickly. In vice, the trait often plays out in subtle manipulation and egocentric behavior.When out of balance, the playful monkey might become […]

14:41 14:41

A Bit About Acupuncture

By |2016-12-29T12:24:14+00:00December 16th, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Acupuncture is a safe and effective natural therapy that is used to heal illness, prevent disease and improve well-being. Tiny, hair-thin needles are inserted into specific points in the body, where they are gently stimulated to trigger the body’s natural healing response. Acupuncture is effective for controlling pain and can regulate the body’s physiological functions to treat various internal dysfunction and disorders.

According to traditional acupuncture theory, there are twelve energy channels called “meridians” running vertically along the length of the human body, each one linking to a specific organ. Illness is caused by obstructed energy flow at certain points along the meridians. Acupuncture therapy stimulates meridian flow and harmonizes the body’s energy to influence the health of both body and mind.

Researchers have begun to examine in Western medical terms the mechanisms by which acupuncture brings about physiological change. Studies have shown that acupuncture influences both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Further evidence indicates that acupuncture stimulates the release of brain chemicals such as endorphins, which function to relieve pain. Research also suggests that acupuncture increases immune system functioning, improves the circulatory system, decreases muscle tightness, and increases joint flexibility. Clinical trials lend credence to these results: acupuncture has been shown to bring about significant improvement for a variety of diseases.

In countries such as Japan and China, which make up about a fifth of the world’s population, acupuncture has been established as a primary form of health care for thousands of years, where the acupuncturist’s role was comparable to that of the physician. Today in such countries, acupuncture treatment remains an integral component of the health care system, offered in conjunction with Western medicine. In North America, acupuncture has drawn growing public attention in recent […]