08:27 08:27

Autumn’s Energetics–The Season Of The Metal Element

By |2018-09-13T13:36:28+00:00September 10th, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Autumn’s Energetics–The Season Of The Metal Element

April Crowell Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Autumn’s arrival shifts the Qi that had been expanding outward (Yang) in the Summer to begin to shift inward (Yin).  We glide through Late Summer at the equinox and then slide into Autumn–the season of Yin within Yang.  Of the 5 Elements, Autumn is the season that corresponds to the Metal element.

Autumn is the time of harvest and a time to start storing to prepare for Winter’s cold. After shedding their leaves or ripened fruits and seeds, plants die back or their energy retreats to their roots. Appropriately, Autumn’s abundant food is perfectly suited to help our body’s Qi move inward. This allows our bodies to have greater energy to fend off common ailments, a chance to replenish and provide the opportunity to embrace the season’s delights.  During this season, I encourage clients to use foods and tonic herbs like ginseng and rhodiola (if they aren’t treating disharmonies where tonics are contraindicated) to help strengthen the body for the upcoming colder months.

Autumn is a wonderful time to clear out old habits that we no longer need–letting go of that which harms us.  It’s a good to time to consolidate and begin storing energy.  This might include resting more, or adjusting your exercise–take long walks, practice T’ai Chi or Qigong and include meditation into your routine.  

Like all of the 5 Elements, each season has numerous correspondences that Chinese medicine practitioners use to identify patterns in clients, both physical and mental, emotion.  Let’s look at a few major correspondence of Autumn.

Autumn Correspondences

Season Autumn
Element Metal
Color White and metallic
Sound Sighing
Climate Dry
State of growth Decline
Odor Rotten
Flavor Pungent
Yin organ & time Lungs: 3-5am
Yang organ & time Colon: 5-7am
Body tissue Skin
Sense organ Nose
Emotion Grief and longing
Soul Corporal
Vice Obsession with physical appearance
Virtue  Inspiration and […]

14:35 14:35

Understanding The Season of Late Summer

By |2018-05-31T13:35:43+00:00September 3rd, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Holistic Living, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

The days are growing shorter, the air has a crisp bite, the kids are back in school and the first leaves are starting to change.  It’s not Summer anymore, yet it’s not really Fall either.  We are drifting from Summer into Late Summer.  Most of us have heard of  Indian or Late Summer,  there is a sudden warming glow again before Autumn takes hold.  In Chinese medicine this is a special season all its own.  In truth, the season encompasses four particular times of year, not just Late Summer.  Late Summer or ‘Dojo’, as it is called by the Japanese, is the buffer between each of the four main seasons. It is a time of balance, a buffering from shifting from one season to the next corresponding to the week before and after each equinox and the solstice.  This time of year is all about centering and it provides us some excellent opportunities to nourish our bodies, especially the digestive system.   […]

09:47 09:47

The 5 Elements (Wu Hsing)

By |2018-05-31T13:35:43+00:00September 3rd, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, The Seasons|Tags: , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Like Yin/Yang theory, the 5 Elements (or Wu Hsing) are a founding principle of Chinese medicine.  Each of the 5 Elements (Fire, Earth, Metal, Water & Wood) describes the natural dynamic flow of Qi  through the correspondences for season, flavor, organ, climate condition, sound, time of day, and emotion—just to name a few.  By understanding the 5 Elements we can use them to both prevent and treat many imbalances.  Here’s a (very) brief overview of the 5 Elements.

Wood is the element associated with the season of Spring, dawn and youth.  It means new growth and is represented by the color green.   The energy is expansive, moving up and in all directions.  Wood rules the Liver and GallBladder organs and is affected by emotions of anger and frustration.  The climatic factor associated with the element is Wind, which can appear as disharmonies in the body like Bell’s palsy, ticks and epilepsy.  The flavor is sour like lemons and vinegar.  Find out more about eating in Spring.

Fire is associated with Summer, noon time, when we are most active.  The energy is at its peak before calming.  Fire moves upward and hot and it rules the Heart, Pericardium, Small Intestines and the Triple Burner.  Its emotion is joy and elation.  It represented by the color red and heat. Disharmonies may appear as nervous agitation, excessive sweating, thirst and fever.  Its flavor is bitter such as, dark greens, olives and roasted seaweed.  Find out more about eating in Summer.

Earth represents a state of neutrality or balance.   Although often called Late Summer, its season is actually the transition from one to another–the equinoxes and solistices.  It symbolizes rebalancing, […]