10:13 10:13

Tyra’s Blood Building Stew

By |2018-11-08T12:55:47+00:00November 1st, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Crock pot, Recipes, Seasonal Recipes, Soups and Stew, Winter Recipes|Tags: , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Tyra’s Blood Building Stew

A wintertime favorite of Tyra’s that is deeply nourishing and warming.

[…]

08:01 08:01

Roasted Roots With Balsamic, Rosemary And Sage

By |2016-12-29T12:24:14+00:00October 27th, 2015|Categories: April's Blogs, Comfort Food, Dairy Free, Diabetes Friendly, Gluten Free, Main Ingredients, Recipes, Seasonal Recipes, Squash and pumpkin, Vegan, Vegetable, Vegetables, Vegetarian|Tags: , , , , , , |Comments Off on Roasted Roots With Balsamic, Rosemary And Sage

 

Roasted roots are a staple for my family in the fall and winter.  You can easily vary this recipe to use other roots like turnips or rutabaga, winter squash or different herbs.  I often double the batch, eating the leftovers as is for the next meal or as the base for a luscious winter root stew.

Enjoy!

Contributed by April Crowell

 

 

 Roasted Roots With Balsamic, Rosemary And Sage – – carrots, potato, yam or sweet potato or butternut squash, onions, beets, parsnips, garlic (optional), rosemary, sage, olive oil (start on the low side and add more just to coat–you don’t want oily vegetables), balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper, Prep your veg!: Preheat oven to 425˚.

Peel all vegetables and dice into 1 1/2 inch pieces.
Place vegetables on a baking sheet large enough so they can all lay flat.
Stem and chop herbs and spread over vegetables.
Drizzle vegetables with olive oil and balsamic. Spread oil and vinegar evenly so that vegetables are well coated. Even vegetables back out on sheet.

; Roast vegetables: Roast vegetables in oven turning vegetables every 15-20 minutes. Add more oil or if they are too dry. Roast for about 45-60minutes or until vegetables are tender and slightly crisp on the edges. ; – Energetics:  Roots are grounding, warming and nourish the earth element.  They drain dampness and strengthen the Stomach and Spleen and build blood. The vinegar lightly astringes. Rosemary and sage drain dampness and stimulate digestion.

Primary season: Fall/Winter

for more recipes from April check out her personal website at <a href="http://aprilcrowell.com">aprilcrowell.com</a>

12:16 12:16

Minted Pea Soup

By |2018-05-31T13:42:38+00:00April 29th, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Gluten Free, Lentils and Legumes, Recipes, Soups and Stew, Spring, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Pea soup? Oh, yes! Peas are high in minerals, vitamin C, D, protein and folic acid. And they are simply delicious in bright and lively soup.  This soup is beautiful for spring as it contains several foods that specifically prevent or treat spring maladies.  Peas, cool and enter the Liver, Stomach, Spleen and Heart, relieving congestion and aiding Qi flow. The warm pungents (onion family) drain phlegm and clear the sinuses and aid digestion.  Mint, a cool pungent, also treats sinuses and Lung and Liver patterns. For additional color garnish with fresh chive blossoms.

Enjoy!

April

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Minted Pea Soup – – onion (diced), leek (cleaned and diced), scallions (diced), olive oil, garlic (crushed), peas (fresh is ideal!), vegetable or chicken stock, chives, fresh mint (crushed), salt and pepper (to taste), fresh cream, In large sauce pan sauté onions, leek and scallions in olive oil until onions are translucent. Add garlic and peas and sauté for 2 more minutes. Add stock and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.  

Add chives and mint and cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and transfer to blender (or use an immersion blender) puree until smooth. Add salt and pepper to taste and garnish with a dollop of cream and fresh chives.

 ; – Health benefits: <a href="http://www.pulseholistichealth.com/living-with-the-seasons/merry-mints-healing-energetics-mint/">Mint</a> is abundant in the Spring and with good reason, their medicinal properties are numerous and particularly beneficial to many Spring maladies from <a href="http://aprilcrowell.com/blogs/its-all-in-your-head-treating-headaches-with-chinese-medicine/">headaches </a>to <a href="http://aprilcrowell.com/blogs/the-liver-in-chinese-medicine-controller-of-planning-and-vision/">Liver </a>patterns.. Use them in teas to help lift the spirit, counter allergies and sinus congestion, aid digestion and help calm aggression and tempers that often arise with the season.

Primary season: Spring and Autumn

<a href="http://www.pulseholistichealth.com/nutrition-articles/peas-please-a-…at-an-old-food/">Learn more about Peas!</a> – main course – Main […]

16:52 16:52

Roasted Roots with Sage, Rosemary & Basalmic

By |2016-12-29T12:24:17+00:00September 22nd, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Diabetes Friendly, Gluten Free, Recipes, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Roasted roots are a staple for my family in the fall and winter.  You can easily vary this recipe to use other roots, winter squash or different herbs.  I often double the batch, eating the leftovers as is or as the base for a luscious  root stew.Roasted Roots with Sage, Rosemary & Basalmic – – carrots, potatoes, butternut squash (peeled and seeded), yellow onions, beets, parsnips, rosemary, sage, balsamic vinegar, olive oil (extra virgin), salt and pepper, Prep the vegetables: Scrub the carrots, potatoes, parsnips and dice into 1 1/2 inch pieces.
Peel all onions and beetes and dice into 1 1/2 inch pieces.
Peel and seed the butternut squash.
Place vegetables on a baking sheet large enough so they can all lay flat.
Stem and chop herbs and spread over vegetables.
; Roast the vegetables: Drizzle vegetables with olive oil and balsamic.
Spread oil and vinegar evenly so that vegetables are well coated.
Even vegetables out on baking sheet, making sure they don’t overlap.
Roast in preheated 425˚ oven. Turn vegetables every 15 minutes adding more oil and vinegar if they are too dry. Roast for about 45 minutes or until vegetables are tender and slightly crisp on the edges. ; – Healing Energetics:  Roots are grounding, warming and nourish the earth element.  They drain dampness and strengthen the Stomach and Spleen and build blood. The vinegar lightly astringes. Rosemary and sage drain dampness and stimulate digestion.
Primary season: Fall/Winter

Contributed by April Crowell

11:34 11:34

Honey Spiced Nuts

By |2016-12-29T12:24:19+00:00September 10th, 2014|Categories: April's Blogs, Autumn, Blogs, Herbs & Spices, Snacks, Winter|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Spiced nuts are staple in my kitchen.  I make up a large batch and freeze them. A small bowl is set out on the counter for snacks and we toss them onto salads, over hot grain cereals, into granola or send them off to school for a nutritious snack. This recipe is a general guide, feel free to use your favorite spice combinations or to add in minced candied ginger or dried fruits like cranberries.Honey Spiced Nuts – – mixed nuts (cashews, pecans, walnuts…choose your favorites), honey or maple syrup (start with less and increase to just cover the nuts, to avoid gooey nuts), cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, salt and pepper (to taste), – Healing Benefits: Although nuts will vary in their content of protein, oils, vitamins and minerals we can look at them overall and get the general idea of what they have to offer. As a group nuts build and strengthen the body.  They add on weight and fight deficiencies.  Yin building (fluids and fats) and warming nuts are good for thin, weak and frail types but should be avoided if there is excess dampness, phlegm or yeast.  Too many nuts can scatter the energy making a person feel ungrounded or unfocused.

Primary Season: Autumn and Winter.