11:47 11:47

Shi Fan (Rice Congee or Jook)

By | 2018-05-15T16:50:54+00:00 September 19th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Comfort Food, Common Conditions, Crock pot, Gluten Free, Recipes, Soups and Stew, Vegan, Vegetarian, Whole Grains|Tags: , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Shi Fan (Rice Congee or Jook)

Congee, Shi-Fan (literally, rice water) or Jook. Whatever name you give it, rice porridge has been the foundation of nutritional healing since…well, we started playing with fire and cooking.  It is my first recommendation for anyone who is weak or ill, whether young or old.
Congee is a eaten by millions as a breakfast food.  The simple gruel is served with a variety of side dishes, shredded vegetables and fish, shredded meats and pickles.

Besides being a great morning start, congee is a fantastic healing food.

It’s just rice and water or broth.  Perhaps another ingredient is added to added to create a specific result. Sounds boring right? However, sometimes simplicity is the best approach to healing.  I always consider the client’s digestive vitality first in any treatment.  If they have problems absorbing nutrients for whatever reason, be it illness, chemo or radiation treatment or constitutional weakness,  they will not transform the food they eat into healing nutrient qi.   In these cases, simple foods cooked for a long period place less of a burden on the digestive system.

Who can benefit from congee?

Anyone.  I’ve seen it work wonders with toddlers on acid reflux medicines to seniors battling dementia, those going through chemo and radiation to those just fighting the common cold.   There is no magic, it is just simplicity.

Healing benefits of congee

Rice is neutral to warming, there are over 8 thousand varieties of rice and very few people are allergic to rice. If you are someone avoiding gluten…use a gluten free rice.  Rice tonifies the Qi and Blood and harmonizes the Middle Burner (your digestive system), the Stomach and the Spleen.  Water balances our PH, detoxes and nourishes Yin.  The rest of the recipe is up to […]

08:56 08:56

Ash-e-reshteh (Persian New Year Noodles With Beans)

By | 2017-05-01T09:32:53+00:00 May 1st, 2017|Categories: Diabetes Friendly, Lentils and Legumes, Recipes, Soups and Stew|Comments Off on Ash-e-reshteh (Persian New Year Noodles With Beans)

We thank Soraya Maleki Spence, who used to work at Pulse, for this fantastic recipe.  A traditional soup served at Nowruz-the Persian New Year in the March and represents new life and longevity.  I prepped this for the website several years ago and I’ll be honest… it makes a fabulous breakfast.Ash-e-reshteh (Persian New Year Noodles With Beans) – – chickpeas (washed and soaked overnight), kidney beans (washed and soaked overnight), fava beans (washed and soaked overnight), dry lentils (rinsed and drained), yellow onions, olive oil, garlic, tumeric (ground), mint leaves (minced or torn), thin egg noodles (broken into thirds), leafy greens (spinach or chard) (stemmed and coarsely chopped), dill leaves (minced), cilantro (minced), parsley or flat-leaf parsley (minced), plain, unsweetened yogurt, chicken or vegetable stock, sea salt, Peel and dice one of the onions. In a large pot over medium-high heat 4 T. of olive oil. Add onion and saute until onions are lightly browned, about 5 minutes.

Drain and rinse chickpeas, kidney and fava beans. Add beans to the onion along with 4 minced cloves of garlic, the turmeric and the lentils. Sauté for 1 minute then add the stock and bring to a boil. Boil, covered for 1 hour. Loosen lid on the pot, so the pot is partially covered and continue simmering the stock and beans for 1 1/2 hours more, stirring occasionally. Season with salt.; Peel and slice the remaining onions into thin half moon shapes. In a large skillet, heat 3 T. olive oil over high heat. Add in the onions and sauté, stirring frequently until caramelized. Add in remaining garlic and mint and sauté for […]

10:13 10:13

Tyra’s Blood Building Stew

By | 2017-04-24T09:51:11+00:00 February 1st, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Crock pot, Recipes, Seasonal Recipes, Soups and Stew, Winter Recipes|Tags: , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Tyra’s Blood Building Stew

A wintertime favorite of Tyra’s that is deeply nourishing and warming.

[…]

09:12 09:12

French Onion Soup

By | 2017-04-24T09:47:21+00:00 August 26th, 2016|Categories: Autumn Recipes, Comfort Food, Crock pot, Diabetes Friendly, Late Summer/Seasonal Change Recipes, Recipes|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on French Onion Soup

This recipe comes from Daverick Legget’s book Recipes for Self-Healing.  The following is his intro to the soup.

The art of making a good onion soup is to cook the onions slowly, preferably in a heavy cast iron pot.  Beef stock is more traditional than the miso suggested in this recipe and may be substituted if preferred.  Served with a good hunk of crusty bread it is almost irresistible.

Contributed by Nathan Mandigo

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12:16 12:16

Minted Pea Soup

By | 2018-03-29T11:48:45+00:00 April 29th, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Gluten Free, Lentils and Legumes, Recipes, Soups and Stew, Spring, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian|Tags: , , |Comments Off on Minted Pea Soup

Pea soup? Oh, yes! Peas are high in minerals, vitamin C, D, protein and folic acid. And they are simply delicious in bright and lively soup.  This soup is beautiful for spring as it contains several foods that specifically prevent or treat spring maladies.  Peas, cool and enter the Liver, Stomach, Spleen and Heart, relieving congestion and aiding Qi flow. The warm pungents (onion family) drain phlegm and clear the sinuses and aid digestion.  Mint, a cool pungent, also treats sinuses and Lung and Liver patterns. For additional color garnish with fresh chive blossoms.

Enjoy!

April

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Minted Pea Soup – – onion (diced), leek (cleaned and diced), scallions (diced), olive oil, garlic (crushed), peas (fresh is ideal!), vegetable or chicken stock, chives, fresh mint (crushed), salt and pepper (to taste), fresh cream, In large sauce pan sauté onions, leek and scallions in olive oil until onions are translucent. Add garlic and peas and sauté for 2 more minutes. Add stock and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.  

Add chives and mint and cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and transfer to blender (or use an immersion blender) puree until smooth. Add salt and pepper to taste and garnish with a dollop of cream and fresh chives.

 ; – Health benefits: <a href="http://www.pulseholistichealth.com/living-with-the-seasons/merry-mints-healing-energetics-mint/">Mint</a> is abundant in the Spring and with good reason, their medicinal properties are numerous and particularly beneficial to many Spring maladies from <a href="http://aprilcrowell.com/blogs/its-all-in-your-head-treating-headaches-with-chinese-medicine/">headaches </a>to <a href="http://aprilcrowell.com/blogs/the-liver-in-chinese-medicine-controller-of-planning-and-vision/">Liver </a>patterns.. Use them in teas to help lift the spirit, counter allergies and sinus congestion, aid digestion and help calm aggression and tempers that often arise with the season.

Primary season: Spring and Autumn

<a href="http://www.pulseholistichealth.com/nutrition-articles/peas-please-a-…at-an-old-food/">Learn more about Peas!</a> – main course – […]

09:45 09:45

Nabe Pot (Japanese New Year’s Soup)

By | 2016-12-29T12:24:16+00:00 January 23rd, 2015|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Comfort Food, Diabetes Friendly, Recipes, Soups and Stew, The Seasons, Vegetables, Vegetarian, Winter|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Nabe Pot (Japanese New Year’s Soup)

Each Asian culture has its own New Year’s tradition.  In Japan, the Nabe pot often makes an appearance.  The process takes a little time, but that is a part of the celebration–taking time with family and friends.  The nabe stock is made from mushrooms soaked overnight and the soup is then heated and served at the dinner table with fresh vegetables.  Feel free to vary the vegetables to your tastes.   Just lovely.Nabe Pot (Japanese New Year’s Soup) – Nabe pots soups that are heated and served at the dinner table as part of Japanese New Year traditions. – shiitake mushrooms, chicken thighs with bones ( remove the bones and reserve for the stock), salmon filet (optional), tiger prawns (peeled with tails left on (optional)), bak choi (cleaned), carrot (peeled and sliced), daikon radish (peeled and sliced), spring onions or scallions (thinly sliced), bean sprouts (rinsed and drained), cabbage (thinly slice), tamari, firm tofu (pressed to drain water and thinly sliced), lime (thinly sliced), sake, Make the stock: For the stock. Soak shiitakes overnight in 4 cups of water.
Strain water in a pan, bring to boil and add in chicken bones, reduce heat to medium.
Skim stock as scum rises up to the surface. Simmer stock until it reduces one third.
Cut chicken and salmon into bite sized chunks. Boil these in 2 cups of water with 1 T. sake for 1 minute. Drain immediately under cold water.
Clean and remove shiitake stems. ; Make the nabe: Pour stock into a clay (donabe) pot or sukiyaki pot and place over table top burner.
Add remaining sake to stock and bring to boil.
Add the daikon and carrots and cook over medium heat for 15 minutes.
Add in […]

18:23 18:23

Stout-hearted Beef Stew

By | 2015-10-21T09:38:56+00:00 January 2nd, 2015|Categories: Blogs, Comfort Food, Crock pot, Meat and Fish|Tags: , , |Comments Off on Stout-hearted Beef Stew

This is a rich and deeply nourishing dish that is perfect for cold winter days.  The sweetness of the prunes is perfectly offset by the stout and pairs with the rich earthiness of the onion and carrot.  Serve it over mashed potatoes or wilt some fresh greens into your bowel.

Contributed by Nathan MandigoStout-hearted Beef Stew – This is a rich and deeply nourishing dish that is perfect for cold winter days. The sweetness of the prunes is perfectly offset by the stout and pairs with the rich earthiness of the onion and carrot. Serve it over mashed potatoes or wilt some fresh greens into your bowel. – onion (thinly sliced), garlic (minced or pressed), carrots (cut into 1/4 in clices), parsely (finely chopped), bay leaf, prunes (pitted), boneless beef chuck (1 inch cubes), flour, black pepper, stout or dark ale (for a brothier soup, use the whole bottle), In a 3 quart or larger electric slow cooker, combine onion, garlic, carrots, parsley, bay leaf and prunes.; Coat beef cubes with flour, then add to cooker and sprinkle with pepper. Pour in stout. Cover and cook on low setting until beef is very tender when pierced (8 to 9 hours); Before serving, skim off excess fat, if necessary. Season with salt to taste.; –

16:21 16:21

Burgundy Mushroom Soup

By | 2016-12-29T12:24:19+00:00 September 22nd, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Comfort Food, Crock pot, Recipes, Soups and Stew|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Burgundy Mushroom Soup

Warm and nourishing, this soup is great as a meal on its own for a chilly night.  The flavor of this soup can be varied depending on the variety of mushrooms and the broth used. Have fun with it.Burgundy Mushroom Soup – – butter or olive oil, yellow onion (finely diced), mixed fresh mushrooms (bellas, morels, shiitake, et) (minced (if you use dried soak them for at least an hour in cool water first)), mushrooms (coarsely chopped (yes, another cup)), garlic (minced), tamari or soy sauce, paprika, celery salt, dill weed, ground pepper, burgundy or heavy red wine, beef or vegetable broth (you can also use the soaking water if you used dried mushrooms), sour cream or unsweetened yogurt (optional), In large stock pot, melt the butter. n large stock pot, melt butter.
Add in onions and sauté until the onions are clear.
Add in all mushrooms and stir. The minced mushrooms create a pulpy base, and the chopped mushrooms just add extra texture.
Add in burgundy, dill, celery, paprika, tamari, pepper and garlic. Stir until fragrant, just a moment or so.
Reduce heat and simmer for about 1 hour.
Adjust spices and mix in sour cream just before serving.
; – Healing Energetics: Mushrooms have a long and rich history as immune and vitality enhancers.  They are used to treat cancers, counter autoimmune disorders. They are packed with valuable minerals such as selenium. Most mushrooms drain or transform damp.  This soup nourishes yin, blood and qi. Made with the beef broth it is particularly Blood building. The paprika, pepper and celery salt help to move the Qi and Blood, furthering improved transformation and transportation. Though there is a bit of cream in this soup it is […]

14:05 14:05

Autumn Vegetable Stew

By | 2016-12-29T12:24:19+00:00 September 2nd, 2014|Categories: Blogs, Gluten Free, Soups and Stew, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on Autumn Vegetable Stew

Butter nut squash or sweet potato?  Which to use?  With this recipe, either is fine.  It some times comes down to what I have on hand and need to use. This soup is delightfully warm, colorful and flavorful–perfect for a crisp day. If you want the soup richer, use organic beef broth instead of chicken or vegetable broth. If you like things a little spicier, add in a little hot pepper.   Serve with warm corn bread or over your favorite hot grain like rice, barley or quinoa.Autumn Vegetable Stew – – large onion (diced), green pepper (chopped), red pepper (chopped), butternut squash (or 2 medium sweet potatoes) (peeled, seeded and cut into 1/2 inch chunks), chicken or vegetable broth, fresh corn (if using frozen, thaw first), carrots (peeled and chopped), butter or olive oil, salt and pepper to taste, In large pot, melt butter or heat oil.
Sauté onions and peppers until just tender.
Add in broth, squash, corn and carrots.
Cook until squash is soft, about 45 minutes.
Adjust the seasonings to your tastes.
Serve with scoop of cooked whole grain like rice or barley or with hot corn bread.; –