About Pulse Holistic Health

Pulse Holistic Health is a made up of independent, self-employed holistic healthcare practitioners that choose to work together for mutual benefit. Individual posts on the Pulse site may be written by a particular practitioner or as a collaborative effort. The views and opinions in Pulse post's, although approved by the group, may not reflect all the views and opinions of the individual practitioners. Members services include: Asian medicine, Traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture, Amma therapy, massage therapy, holistic nutrition, acutonics, holistic health education, and more.
12:17 12:17

Nourishing In Winter’s Depth

By |2019-01-25T12:18:46+00:00January 25th, 2019|Categories: Blogs|0 Comments

In Asian medicine (Chinese medicine) Winter’s energetic nature is one of quiet, calm and stillness.  It’s an ideal time for deep introspection, rest and restoration.  It’s a fine season to spend quality time with friends and family in joy, yet we may often overdo it and find ourselves too busy and anxious.  Here are a few tips to help you harmonize with the season and reap the rewards of winter.

Meditate

Meditation is the activity that can best reconnect us to our deepest selves. It is truly the most profound way to create inner peace and harmony.  It allows us to pull away from habituated emotions and thoughts and allows Qi to flow promoting healing. The benefits of meditation are innumerable and it is truly one of the most profound ways to help strengthen the Kidneys and overall well being.  One of the common complaints I hear from clients about meditation is actually a fear of sitting still. Interesting–the emotion that damages the Kidneys is fear–however, sitting peacefully and breathing deeply isn’t something we should fear.  If you’ve never learned to meditation you may want to seek out a class or teacher who can help you get started.  My general recommendation for those starting, is to pick a time of day (preferably the same time everyday) where they can sit for 15 minutes.  Just sit up straight, close your eyes, soften your breath and be still.  Don’t worry about the emotions and thoughts that float in an out of your being. Consider them like the weather–you can notice them, but you need not act on them.  Just sit.  After a few weeks, bump it up by another 5-10 minutes. I recommend 30 minutes to an hour a day for meditation. Although 15 minutes […]

12:00 12:00

2019 The Year of The Earth Pig

By |2019-01-25T12:08:57+00:00January 25th, 2019|Categories: Blogs|0 Comments

Tuesday, February 5th is the second new moon following the winter solstice.  For Asian cultures this is the New Year and the start of the spring festivals and planting season.  This year the Earth Dog will surrender to the jolly Earth Pig.

A bit about the Asian Zodiac –

Each year of the Asian (Chinese) calendar corresponds to one of the 12 animals (Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Sheep , Monkey, Rooster, Dog and the Pig). Besides the animal, we also cycle through each of the 5 elements (Fire, Earth, Metal, Water and Wood) to create a full 60 year cycle.  By the time you cycle back to the animal year and element that you were born in you will be 60–so, don’t hold your breath.  Each animal carries its own unique personality and disposition, couple that with the elemental energies and can get an idea of the nature of the how the year may play out.

Pigs are the 12th animal in the cycle. Legend has it that all the animals were invited to a great celestial party by the Jade Emperor, the pig overslept and ended up being the last to party. Or if you prefer, another myth has the Pig’s house was destroyed by wolves and he took the time to rebuild his home before coming to the party.

The Pig’s personality and nature –

Happy, big eared and chubby faced, Pigs represent wealth and good fortune in the Asian cultures. Add to this the grounding Yin nature of the Earth element and we should see some stability and blessings this year.  Pigs don’t often draw attention to themselves. Where others may bluster and boast of their works, the diligent and hard working Pig may stay humbly quiet while […]

12:25 12:25

Loving Chocolate–Understanding The Energetics of Chocolate

By |2019-01-25T12:31:58+00:00January 20th, 2019|Categories: Blogs|0 Comments

Who doesn’t love a little chocolate?

Theobroma Cacao is a much loved and very powerful food living up to its ancient name as the food of the gods.    On the average, we Americans each indulge in about 12 pounds of chocolate yearly–hopefully not all at once.  That stretches out about 100 pounds of chocolate being consumed a second–whew–and that’s just Americans who rank 4th in consumption of chocolate worldwide.  The Swiss currently hold the honor of being first for individual consumption of chocolate.

The history of chocolate–in five paragraphs

Use of the cacao tree dates back at least 5,000 years to Brazil and the Amazon and images of the cacao pods were carved into Mayan stone temples dating back to as early as 300 C.E.  A symbol of fertility, vitality and life, the Mayans revered and used cacao extensively.  By 600 C.E. the Mayans had expanded their way of life and were actively cultivating crops of cacao from the Yucatan Peninsula to the Pacific Coast.

The Mayans mixed cocoa with peppers, cornmeal and other foods to create a strong drink that was used for religious ceremonies and a wide variety of medicinal purposes. This wasn’t the sweet confection we are so familiar with now, rather this was a very bitter and thick “bitter water” or xocoatl–which we derived the word chocolate from. The Mayans brewed xocoatl to treat everything from an upset stomach, low energy and libido, lowering fevers, expectorating phlegm, treating blood in the stools and diarrhea. It was also used to regulate sleep–by either encouraging it or prohibiting–a dynamic little trait of chocolate. Woman used it to treat patterns of deficiency including anemia, infertility and decreased breast milk production.

By 1200 C.E. the Aztecs had conquered the Mayan culture, […]

11:22 11:22

Warm To The Core

By |2019-01-25T12:19:31+00:00December 25th, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions, The Seasons, Winter|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Baby, it’s cold outside.  Now that you have an ear worm to pester you for the day, let’s talk about keeping the core of the body warm.

The Asian cultures have a long tradition of dressing to protect the abdomen and the lower back and with good reason–the Kidneys.  Called the “Root of Life” in Chinese medicine, and their energies and organs are greatly protected in classical Asian medicine and martial arts.   In Japanese, the region is called the Hara, in Chinese it’s the Dan Tian. All Asian cultures hold the same concept–the vital energy of the body is centered in the space  located just behind the belly button to between the two kidneys.   If you’ve ever done martial arts, this where you move from.  It’s your core,  and the store house of energy and we want to keep it warm.

The Kidneys are the “Root of Life” and “Sealed Storage”

Let me see if I can boil down a 5 hour lecture into a couple of simple paragraphs.

All organs have a Yin and Yang aspect, however, these two aspects take on a different meaning with the Kidneys.  The Kidneys are the foundation for all Yin and Yang for all organs. One of the first channels to develop as a baby grows, Kidney Yin is the foundation or “root” for the Yin and the Yang organs alike, making it the basis for Fire and Water in the body.  If the Kidney energy is strong, the baby will grow strong and have vitality.  Kidney energy is required for all growth, maturation and reproduction– the bones, marrow, and spine;  and […]

09:33 09:33

Elderberry Syrup and Tea for Colds and Flu

By |2019-01-25T12:20:17+00:00December 23rd, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Elderberry Syrup and Tea for Colds and Flu

As Autumn creeps in I stock my cupboards with a few items to prevent and treat colds and flu. Gan Mao Ling, Kwan Loong oil, vitamin C, Immustim or Wellness Formula, to name a few, but one of my favorites is simple and reliable elderberry tea and syrup.

All parts of the elder plant have a long history in folk medicine. The flower is used to promote sweating and resolve phlegm from exterior pathogens. The inner bark and root are used as strong emetics and to relieve stubborn constipation. The leaves and berries can be made into poultices with vinegar or honey to relieve damp heat in the skin such as poison ivy.

Elderberry syrup is one of the first things that I reach for when someone is starting to fight a cold or flu. From a Chinese medicine perspective there are two major reasons that we get sick: either our system is weak and susceptible to exterior invasion (Lung qi and wei qi deficiency) or the pathogen is exceptionally strong relative to us (think of plagues). Elderberry helps to strengthen any Lung deficiency condition, giving your immune system a powerful boost. It is antiviral and anti-infective, perfect for fighting off those pesky viruses. The berry also has expectorant, diaphoretic and diuretic properties to help move fluids, the bowels and relieve phlegm. It even helps treat food poisoning. Elderberry is high in calcium, vitamins A, C and B6 and iron—and, best of all, it’s tasty and kids don’t usually mind it.

So how do I use it?
I start to use elderberry tea (often mixed with other teas like berry or nettles) several times a week at the start of school or weather transitions. The syrup is handy for […]

08:27 08:27

Tips For Handling The Stomach Flu

By |2019-01-25T12:20:51+00:00December 21st, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Tyra Burgess, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM)

“I am so tired, I have no energy.”

” I am feeling heavy and sick to my stomach. I am queasy and have a slight headache.”

If you have said this to yourself or to someone else, it is likely that you are suffering from the flu. Not the fill your head with snot flu, but the stomach flu. Viral Gastroenteritis, is described by the Mayo clinic as, “Gastroenteritis,  attacks your intestines, causing signs and symptoms, such as:

  •  Watery, usually nonbloody diarrhea — bloody diarrhea usually means you have a different, more severe infection
  • Abdominal cramps and pain
  • Nausea, vomiting or both
  • Occasional muscle aches or headache
Other signs and symptoms are a low grade fever, vomiting, sweating, the hot and cold chills, and general fatigue and achiness. Once one contracts the flu, symptoms will appear with in 1 to three days, and can last anywhere from 24hrs to 7 days. 
 
Treatment for the flu
  • Always come and see your practitioner. While we try to prevent any illness, they do occur, and when they do, we are best utilized as soon as possible, to balance the body’s qi flow, creating balance, and herbal therapies to aid the body through the illness. In our practice we have used several supplements to help bring the body back to balance.
  • Use Pill curing, green clay or charcoal to ease the stomach
  • Take a ginger bath to help push out the pathogen, and kill the invading pathogen as ginger is an excellent microbial. Simply […]
09:45 09:45

Nabe Pot (Japanese New Year’s Soup)

By |2019-01-25T11:05:35+00:00December 2nd, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Comfort Food, Diabetes Friendly, Recipes, Soups and Stew, The Seasons, Vegetables, Vegetarian, Winter|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Nabe Pot (Japanese New Year’s Soup)

Each Asian culture has its own New Year’s tradition.  In Japan, the Nabe pot often makes an appearance.  The process takes a little time, but that is a part of the celebration–taking time with family and friends.  The nabe stock is made from mushrooms soaked overnight and the soup is then heated and served at the dinner table with fresh vegetables.  Feel free to vary the vegetables to your tastes.   Just lovely. Nabe Pot (Japanese New Year's Soup) – Nabe pots soups that are heated and served at the dinner table as part of Japanese New Year traditions. – shiitake mushrooms, chicken thighs with bones ( remove the bones and reserve for the stock), salmon filet (optional), tiger prawns (peeled with tails left on (optional)), bak choi (cleaned), carrot (peeled and sliced), daikon radish (peeled and sliced), spring onions or scallions (thinly sliced), bean sprouts (rinsed and drained), cabbage (thinly slice), tamari, firm tofu (pressed to drain water and thinly sliced), lime (thinly sliced), sake, , Make the stock: For the stock. Soak shiitakes overnight in 4 cups of water.
Strain water in a pan, bring to boil and add in chicken bones, reduce heat to medium.
Skim stock as scum rises up to the surface. Simmer stock until it reduces one third.
Cut chicken and salmon into bite sized chunks. Boil these in 2 cups of water with 1 T. sake for 1 minute. Drain immediately under cold water.
Clean and remove shiitake stems. ; Make the nabe: Pour stock into a clay (donabe) pot or sukiyaki pot and place over table top burner.
Add remaining sake to stock and bring to boil.
Add the daikon and carrots and cook over medium heat for […]

06:56 06:56

Golden Milk

By |2018-12-14T12:56:37+00:00December 1st, 2018|Categories: Beverages, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Herbs & Spices, Recipes|Tags: , , |Comments Off on Golden Milk

Warm and calming, Golden Milk is traditionally drank before going to bed. Black pepper, which contains peperine, is added to the drink to help the body better absorb the curcumin in the turmeric.

12:00 12:00

Mexican Cocoa

By |2018-09-27T11:34:14+00:00September 14th, 2018|Categories: Blogs|Comments Off on Mexican Cocoa

Mexican Cocoa – – unsweetened cocoa powder, cinnamon, cayenne, chili powder, milk of choice (almond, soy or other nut milk. You can also substitute for Irish Creme or a coffee-liqueur), maple syrup, agave or honey (optional–you may not need a sweetener if you milk is sweet), Silver tequila (optional), paprika, cinnamon stick, , Prep the spices: In a saucepan over low heat add the cocoa powder, cinnamon, cayenne and chili. Toast until fragrant about 2 minutes–be careful to not burn the spices and cocoa.; Add the liquds: Slowly pour in milk, whisking gently, until fulling incorporated. Increase heat to medium and bring mixture to a low simmer. Blend in sweetener and remove from heat. ; Prep your mug: Rim a mug with paprika by first dipping the mug rim in a shallow saucer of water then into a saucer of paprika. Add tequila to mug and pour in hot cocoa mixture. Garnish with cinnamon stick and enjoy.; ; – – Blogs

08:27 08:27

Autumn’s Energetics–The Season Of The Metal Element

By |2018-09-13T13:36:28+00:00September 10th, 2018|Categories: April's Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Holistic Living, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Autumn’s Energetics–The Season Of The Metal Element

April Crowell Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP, CHN

Autumn’s arrival shifts the Qi that had been expanding outward (Yang) in the Summer to begin to shift inward (Yin).  We glide through Late Summer at the equinox and then slide into Autumn–the season of Yin within Yang.  Of the 5 Elements, Autumn is the season that corresponds to the Metal element.

Autumn is the time of harvest and a time to start storing to prepare for Winter’s cold. After shedding their leaves or ripened fruits and seeds, plants die back or their energy retreats to their roots. Appropriately, Autumn’s abundant food is perfectly suited to help our body’s Qi move inward. This allows our bodies to have greater energy to fend off common ailments, a chance to replenish and provide the opportunity to embrace the season’s delights.  During this season, I encourage clients to use foods and tonic herbs like ginseng and rhodiola (if they aren’t treating disharmonies where tonics are contraindicated) to help strengthen the body for the upcoming colder months.

Autumn is a wonderful time to clear out old habits that we no longer need–letting go of that which harms us.  It’s a good to time to consolidate and begin storing energy.  This might include resting more, or adjusting your exercise–take long walks, practice T’ai Chi or Qigong and include meditation into your routine.  

Like all of the 5 Elements, each season has numerous correspondences that Chinese medicine practitioners use to identify patterns in clients, both physical and mental, emotion.  Let’s look at a few major correspondence of Autumn.

Autumn Correspondences

Season Autumn
Element Metal
Color White and metallic
Sound Sighing
Climate Dry
State of growth Decline
Odor Rotten
Flavor Pungent
Yin organ & time Lungs: 3-5am
Yang organ & time Colon: 5-7am
Body tissue Skin
Sense organ Nose
Emotion Grief and longing
Soul Corporal
Vice Obsession with physical appearance
Virtue  Inspiration and […]