About April

Diplomate, Asian Bodywork Therapy (Dipl. ABT NCCAOM) Certified Holistic Nutritionist (CHN) AOBTA Certified Instructor & Practitioner I have been practicing and teaching since 1994. I maintain my private therapy practice at Pulse Holistic Health. I write regularly and offer classes in continuing education and for the public.
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Tyra’s Blood Building Stew

By |2018-11-08T12:55:47+00:00November 1st, 2018|Categories: Blogs, Crock pot, Recipes, Seasonal Recipes, Soups and Stew, Winter Recipes|Tags: , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Tyra’s Blood Building Stew

A wintertime favorite of Tyra’s that is deeply nourishing and warming.

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09:23 09:23

Drink More Coffee!

By |2017-02-28T09:28:24+00:00February 28th, 2017|Categories: Blogs, Herbs & Spices, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Guest blogger William Habblett

Harmony Landscape and Design, llc

Did you know coffee is good for us? Well, I don’t know about it being ingested; I’m a horticulturist, not a health practitioner, so I will leave that discussion up to you and your health care practitioner. When it comes to the garden and plant beds, coffee grounds can be you and your plant’s new best friend. Not to mention, that it is a great way to recycle coffee grounds if you are not set up for composting in your landscape.

A few years ago, I started listening to people using coffee grounds around their blueberries and other acid loving plants, and they were touting how great their plants were doing. Well, the scientific data doesn’t necessarily support the acidic action to the soil profile. It would most likely only be in the immediate area of the grounds themselves. However, that doesn’t mean that there aren’t some great benefits to laying out the coffee grounds.

Coffee grounds themselves are comprised of nitrogen rich proteins, lipids, fatty acids, and cellulose that are great for your plants and the soil environment that they are added to. Over time, beneficial fungi and bacteria break down the different compounds for plant availability and improve microorganism soil life. It also increases the availability of soil bound nutrients such as phosphorous, zinc and iron –alleviating a common problem in our alkaline soils.

It has also been […]

15:26 15:26

When Yang Collapses–Rebuilding The Fires

By |2018-05-31T13:41:58+00:00February 11th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Common Conditions|Tags: , , , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CP

Yang collapse–sound pretty severe, right? In Chinese medicine it is–and it’s often a long, slow and difficult hill to climb for recovery.  Why? Literally, you have burnt out the fire and transformative functions in the body.  Most importantly, clients who have reached deep Yang deficiency are notoriously bad about resting– which is essential to rebuilding Yang.

How deficiencies arise

You played too hard. You became severely ill. You didn’t eat or rest appropriately.  You were under too much stress.  Sometimes we can narrow it down and find one thing that may have caused the collapse but most often it’s a number things that combined leading to eventual collapse. There are many avenues in which the body takes impact of stress, illness and daily living, and when we are vital and healthy we bounce back. Overtime, however, we may continue to dwindle and signs of deficiency will show up.  It’s a progressive process that left unchecked will get worse and worse until something gives way.

The progression of deficiency in the body

Qi Deficiency–Qi deficiency is the starting place. Fortunately, Qi deficiency, though common, is very easy to recover from.  You’re a bit tired, worn out from the day, nothing that a good night’s sleep and some appropriate rest can’t fix.   There will be little change in the tongue, and the pulses will feel a little weak, but you will recover quickly.  Find out more about building Qi here.

Yin or Yang?–Left unchecked, Qi deficiency will progress, leading down a path of either Yin or Yang deficiency. Which path you follow depends on life circumstances, constitution, pre-existing weaknesses and other factors.  Truly, both Yin and Yang are going to […]

12:12 12:12

Loving Chocolate–Understanding The Energetics of Chocolate

By |2018-06-01T11:02:46+00:00January 9th, 2017|Categories: April's Blogs, Chinese Medicine, Nutrition Articles|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

April Crowell, Dipl. ABT (NCCAOM), AOBTA CI & CHN

Who doesn’t love a little chocolate?

Theobroma Cacao is a much loved and very powerful food living up to its ancient name as the food of the gods.    On the average, we Americans each indulge in about 12 pounds of the dark treat yearly.  That stretches out about 100 pounds of chocolate being consumed a second–whew–and that’s just Americans who rank 4th in consumption of chocolate worldwide.  Not surprisingly, the Swiss rank first in the world for individual consumption of chocolate.

The history of chocolate–in five paragraphs

Use of the cacao tree dates back at least 5,000 years to Brazil and the Amazon. Images of the cacao pods have been carved into Mayan stone temples dating back to as early as 300 C.E.  A symbol of fertility, vitality and life, the Mayans revered and used cacao extensively.  By 600 C.E. the Mayans had expanded and were cultivating crops of cacao from the Yucatan Peninsula to the Pacific Coast.

The Mayans mixed cocoa with peppers, cornmeal and other foods to create a strong drink that was used for religious ceremonies and a wide variety of medicinal purposes. This wasn’t the sweet confection we are so familiar with now, rather this was a very bitter and thick “bitter water” or xocoatl–which we derived the word chocolate from. The Mayans brewed xocoatl to treat everything from an upset stomach, low energy and libido, to lowering fevers, expectorating phlegm, treating blood in the stools and diarrhea. It was also used to regulate sleep–by either encouraging it or prohibiting–a dynamic little trait of chocolate. Woman used it treat patterns of deficiency including […]

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Congratulations Tyra Burgess!

By |2018-05-31T13:41:53+00:00February 22nd, 2016|Categories: Blogs, Community Announcements & Events|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Pulse is happy to announce that Tyra Burgess has moved from the level of Associate Member to Member as a part of the Pulse Cooperative.  Tyra’s practice at Pulse has grown rapidly over the past year and she has proven to be an enthusiastic part of our business and community.  She’s an attentive and caring practitioner that works with a diverse clientele.  We look forward to her continued involvement and growth.

Find out more about Tyra here.